The Writing Center

The Writing Center provides free tutoring for all RWU students enrolled in writing courses or involved in writing-related projects.

Summer Session 2021 Tutoring

The Tutoring Center will provide limited tutoring for math, science, writing and French for Summer Session 2021 courses. For math, science, writing and French in Zoom: Please go to Bridges and click on the course titled “RWU Online Tutoring Summer 21.” If you do not see this course in Bridges, first check to see if you have somehow deactivated it. To check, click on the waffle in the top right of your screen with “My Courses” beside it. In the list of courses, under “SM 21,” you should see “RWU Online Tutoring Summer 21.” Click on the star beside the name of the course to make it yellow. Refresh your screen and see if the course is there. If it still is not there, please contact Karen Bilotti at kbilotti@rwu.edu.

For the Writing Center email tutoring service, please go to the Search bar at rwu.edu and put “Writing Tutoring Via Email” and then follow the instructions to submit your paper for review. Or you can get to the page at this web address: http://rwu.edu/go/email-writinghelp .

We look forward to working with you this semester! 

Questions? Please contact:
Writing tutoring: Karen Bilotti, Director of the Tutoring Center and Writing Center, at kbilotti@rwu.edu
Science tutoring: Tracey McDonnell Wysor, Coordinator of the Science Center, at twysor@rwu.edu
Math tutoring: Richard Fullerton, Coordinator of the Math Center, at rfullerton@rwu.edu

 

Writing Center Location

Tutoring Center 
Main Library, 2nd floor

Hours of Operation
Monday - Thursday: 9 am - 8 pm
Friday: 9 am - 3 pm
Sunday: 2 pm - 8 pm

Please like us on Facebook at "RWU Tutoring Centers" for end-of-semester, holiday, or weather-related updates/changes to our normal schedule. 

Our Mission

The RWU Writing Center’s mission is to create an environment that is inclusive and collaborative, resists oppressive aspects of writing, and forms connections. Students should feel welcomed and respected sharing their ideas in all writing center spaces. 

Tutors will adjust their techniques and methods to meet the needs of a diverse community of learners. Tutors will work collaboratively and empathetically with students to identify and discuss structure, grammar, documentation, word choice, and content, as well as to brainstorm ideas.

Tutors will support and motivate students in the way most comfortable for the individual while still challenging students to examine their ideas and test their assumptions.

Students should feel confident that their time engaging with the tutor has been a helpful part of the revision process and that their voice has been prioritized.

We believe:

·        “Students’ Right to Their Own Language” must be affirmed and practiced.

·         Tutoring is a reciprocal learning experience.

·         All students have the potential to be effective writers in their own voice.

·         It is vital for students to feel comfortable in using their pronouns as well as feel represented no matter their identity.

·         Students should feel encouraged and heard regardless of any aspect of their identity.

What we do:

At its best, tutoring involves a conversation between a tutor and a writer about a text. Tutors will work collaboratively with students to identify and discuss grammatical, mechanical, documentation and revision issues, particularly as those concerns affect a reader’s understanding; however, students should not expect tutors to “catch and fix” errors. The tutors are also an important resource for students who want to understand and adhere to the expectations of college writing and are new to the discourse community. Therefore, tutors will also help all students make informed decisions about language choice, tone, and formality. We will work very hard to provide tutoring that is informative, engaging, thought provoking, ethical, culturally competent and, ultimately, helpful.

The tutor will discuss grammatical or mechanical issues that impact the readability of the text as well as “large-scale” concerns such as (but not limited to) the following:

  • Is the thesis defined and arguable?
  • Does it control the content of the rest of the paper?
  • Does the paper address what is asked for in the assignment prompt?
  • Does the student have a clear understanding of the material in the assigned text (if there is one) and in their own text?
  • Are the topic sentences focused and relate back to and support the thesis?
  • Are there appropriate transitional words and phrases to provide coherence?
  • Is the organizational pattern the most appropriate?
  • Are the most important points supported with sufficient details and examples?
  • Is the tone appropriate and consistent throughout the paper? 
  • Is the paper formatted appropriately, according to the assigned documentation system?

This mission statement was created by students in the Spring 21 WTNG 299: Tutoring in the Writing Center course and the Writing Center tutors. 

For students, here are six ways to get the most out of a tutoring session:

  1. Come in to the Writing Center early in the process. Don’t wait until the day the assignment is due!   The stress level for students and tutors is multiplied when there is an imminent deadline looming over a tutoring session.
  2. Arrive with some part of the process underway.  If you want to work on a paper, have a draft or outline at least started.  Even if you need help brainstorming, you can still begin that process on your own.
  3. Know your assignment! Bring your assignment sheet, any pertinent handouts, and/or textbooks to the tutoring session.  If you and your tutor have some questions about the assignment, coming in early in the process (as suggested in #1) will allow you the opportunity to confer with your instructor and resume the session when you are sure of the assignment.
  4. If possible, set the agenda for your own tutoring session. While tutors can review a paper for general effectiveness, it is often more productive if you come in and ask to work on a specific concern.
  5. Be an active participant. You should be prepared to participate in a dialogue about your writing and work on any specific concerns you have, such as sentence skills, paragraph structure, and thesis construction.  We encourage you to take notes during the tutoring session, so you will remember what you worked on.  Remember: The tutors are trained not to “fix” papers for students; we will, however, help students become better writers.
  6. Follow through. Complete the revisions you and your tutor worked on before you submit the paper.  If the tutor suggests you come back for additional assistance, be sure you do.

Phone Contact
Department Secretary: 
Wendy MacDonough
254-3219 

Coordinator of Writing Center
Karen Bilotti
Director of The Tutoring Center
(401)254-3630
kbilotti@rwu.edu