Summer Sessions

Welcome to Summer at Roger Williams University!

There is no better time of year to get ahead or catch up!

Take a look at the wide selection of online classes being offered this Summer. RWU has been offering online classes for years and this year's schedule is more robust than ever before.

Summer 2022LengthStart DateEnd Date
Full Session 13 weeksMay 23rdAugust 26th
Summer I3 weeksMay 23rdJune 10th 
Summer II 5 weeksJune 13thJuly 15th
Summer III 8 weeksJuly 5thAugust 26th
Summer IV 10 weeksJune 13thAugust 19th

Academic Calendar

Tuition

Online 3-credit undergraduate class tuition: $1,299
Active Military and their spouses 3-credit class tuition: $750 
Additional discounts may be available.
Graduate class tuition varies, view current rates.

Courses Offered

AAH.122.91C History of Art/Architecture II
3 credits | Online | MWTh 8 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. | Summer II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Art and Architectural History Core Concentration. A continuation of History of Art I, this course introduces the visual cultures of Africa, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Asia beginning with the Renaissance and ending with our own modern day. Using key issues and monuments as the focus of discussion, the works of art covered include painting, photography, film, sculpture and architecture. Emphasis is placed on the political, religious and social contexts of the object, as well as the artistic process.

ANSOC.105.91C Introduction to Sociology
3 credits | Online | MWTh 8 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. | Full Session
Prerequisites: None. Requirement Fulfillment: Fulfills a course requirement in the Anthropology + Sociology Core Concentration. The study of individuals in society, and an introduction to the basic concepts through which sociology derives its intellectual form, such as socialization, social groups, institutions, stratification, and social change.

ARCH.100.01 Exploring Architecture
3 credits | Bristol Campus | MTWThF 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. | July 11 - Aug. 5
Enrollment limited to high school students who have completed their junior year and high school students who have completed their sophomore year with permission at the time of application. A four-week introduction to architectural issues, concepts, and basic design methodology for high school students interested in understanding architecture as a possible area of college study and career. Course instruction is via workshops and individualized studio critique emphasizing freehand drawing, design exercises, field trips, lectures and portfolios. The grade is based on overall performance with special emphasis on the quality of a major project.

ARCH.100.02 Exploring Architecture
3 credits | Bristol Campus 

ARCH.100.91C Exploring Architecture
3 credits | Online | MTWThF 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. | July 11 - Aug. 5
Enrollment limited to high school students who have completed their junior year and high school students who have completed their sophomore year with permission at the time of application. A four-week introduction to architectural issues, concepts, and basic design methodology for high school students interested in understanding architecture as a possible area of college study and career. Course instruction is via workshops and individualized studio critique emphasizing freehand drawing, design exercises, field trips, lectures and portfolios. The grade is based on overall performance with special emphasis on the quality of a major project.

ARCH.114.01 Architectural Design Core Studio II
5 credits | Bristol Campus | TWF 1:30 p.m. - 5:40 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: ARCH 113. Fulfills requirement in ARCH.BS Major. This course continues the first semesters focus on elemental design principles and visual communication, but initiates a departure from the abstract realm of design into the tangible world of built architectural form. The projects and their supporting lectures examine the language of architecture through exercises exploring fundamental Architectural Design Principles: spatial organizations, circulation and movement, simple structural and enclosure systems, spatial articulation, site response and solar orientation. To ensure clarity and understanding all building programs are simple but evocative and project sites vary from rural to urban and from flat to sloped. Minimum passing grade average of C required in Arch 113-114. 

ARCH.214.01 Architectural Design Core Studio IV
5 credits | Bristol Campus | TWF 1:30 p.m. - 5:50 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: ARCH 213, MATH 136 or higher. Fulfills requirement in ARCH.BS Major. This studio continues to develop the students design process and explores the concepts and strategies that have the capacity to significantly determine building form. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship of design to program, structure and materials through the study of dwellings. Special attention will be paid to an understanding of human scale and its impact upon design. Short sequential exercises enable students to develop an understanding of the use of different materials and their structural implications. Bearing wall, columnar (including free-plan) and modular building systems will be studied. These shorter problems will be followed by a longer assignment that uses different urban sites in a variety of locations as the catalyst for an investigation into how the fundamental human need for shelter is affected by regional and cultural precedents and particular climatic conditions. Students are asked to address basic environmental issues by considering passive strategies for heating and cooling. The Development of graphic, computer and three-dimensional communication skills development are also continued. Faculty lectures will be integrated into the semester and a digital portfolio will be required. Minimum passing grade of C required.

ARCH.313.01 Architectural Design Core Studio V
5 credits | Bristol Campus | TWTh 1:30 p.m. - 5:40 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: ARCH 214. Fulfills requirement in ARCH.BS Major. The focus of this Studio is upon the integration of building form, structure as space-generator, construction materials & assemblies and sustainability themes in architectural design. The Studio also engages the continued refinement of four broad areas of architectural design education: (1) development of a theory base; (2) development of design methods and studio skills; (3) urban issues; and (4) development of a fuller appreciation for the understanding of construction technology and its function as a medium for architectural design. Minimum passing grade of C required. 

ARCH.322.91C Theory of Architecture
3 credits | Online | MWTh 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Summer II
Prerequisite: ARCH 325 or Graduate Standing Fulfills requirement in ARCH.BS Major The intention of this course is to familiarize students with a variety of historical, theoretical and methodological issues that have structured contemporary understanding and criticism of architecture. The class introduces students to the polemics and debates of the post-war period, the developments and influence of non-Western modern architecture, post-modernism, the theoretical investigations centered around structuralism and post-structuralism, the development of the various schools of architectural theory in the 1970s and 1980s, and contemporary theoretical and critical positions.

ARCH.325.91C History of Modern Architecture 
3 credits | Online | MWTh 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Summer II|
Prerequisite: AAH 121-122 or URBN 100 or Graduate Standing or permission of instructor. Fulfills requirement in ARCH.BS Major. This course on modern architecture examines buildings, cities, and landscapes in relation to the visual arts, culture, politics, and technological and social change. It begins with the origins of modern architecture in Western Europe, continues with an exploration of key 19th-century architects and theorists. It highlights the 20th-century avant-gardes and concludes with the crystallization of modern architecture in the West and around the world. The course seeks to explain the modern not only as a visual phenomenon, but also as an intellectual, philosophical, and cultural idea.

ARCH.413.01 Advanced Architectural Design Studio
5 credits | Bristol Campus | TWF 1:30 p.m. - 5:40 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: ARCH.313 and ARCH.325. Pre/Co-requisite: ARCH.231, ARCH 322, and ARCH.335. Students may select from a number of thematically focused directed studios in order to fulfill the Advanced Architectural Design Studio requirement for the Bachelor of Science and BS + Masters of Architecture degree programs. Students completing a Bachelor of Science are required to take either an Advanced Architectural Design Studio or an Advanced Topical Design Studio.

ASL.430.91C Special Topics: Receptive Comprehension
3 credits | Online | TWTh 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I
This Special Topics course will expose students to more complex American Sign Language. More importantly, it will introduce students to issues that face the Deaf community in the 21st century-issues in education, career choices, and in life itself, so they can use the language successfully in real world situations. Topics may include: American Sign Language Through Storytelling, American Sign Language and English, and Audism and the Campaign to Vanquish ASL.

CD.220.91C Issues in Community Development
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Overview of the concepts, theories and applications in the field of community development. This is the foundation course for the Community Development program, but it is appropriate for all students interested in a comprehensive look at the elements required to understand what makes for successful communities, from housing to education, to social services and infrastructure

CD.351.91C Sustainable Economic & Community Development
3 credits | Full Session
Explores key subject areas related to sustainable economic development, including business creation and retention, microenterprises, co-ops, job creation, asset development, sector analysis, the connection between economic development and social health.  Examines the role that community development professionals can and should play in ensuring that economic development occurs in a sustainable manner.

COMM.210.91C Intro to Public Speaking
3 credits | Online | TWTh 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer II
Note: Does not satisfy a requirement in the Global Communication core concentration Emphasizes effective speaking techniques for public as well as everyday situations. Focuses on identifying, organizing, and presenting facts, opinions, and values to a variety of audiences.

COMM.210.92C Intro to Public Speaking
3 credits | Online | MTW 6 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. | Summer III
Note: Does not satisfy a requirement in the Global Communication core concentration Emphasizes effective speaking techniques for public as well as everyday situations. Focuses on identifying, organizing, and presenting facts, opinions, and values to a variety of audiences.

COMM.240.91C Digital Communication:Tech Modes Methods
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I

COMM.250.91C Intercultural Communication
3 credits | Online | TWThF 1 p.m. - 4:10 p.m. | Summer I
Prerequisite: COMM 100 or COMM 101 The field of intercultural communication examines the ways in which communication creates and represents social orders and cultural identities. In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of intercultural communication and apply theoretical/conceptual frameworks to real and hypothetical cases of cross cultural (mis)communication and representation. The relationship between communication and culture will be explored in order to understand how communication does not simply transmit cultural information but constitutes and maintains cultural realities. Further, students will learn to identify the different components of intercultural communication and how these impinge on intercultural encounters in the workplace and the larger community. 

CORE.101.91C Scientific Investigations
4 credits | Online | MTW 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer II
This interdisciplinary course explores important issues of societal and personal relevance by evaluating testable ideas through experimentation and literature-based research in lecture and laboratory settings. Students will use the process of science to generate data and synthesize new ideas to come to evidence-based conclusions that will illuminate responses to the three core questions: Who am I, what can I know, and given what I know, how should I act? Lecture content will vary across sections to reflect the expertise of instructors from the breadth of scientific disciplines including astronomy, biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, oceanography, physics, public health, and sustainability studies, among others. The laboratory experience complements the lecture by providing students with hands-on opportunities to use the scientific method as they lead their own research investigations. 

CORE.101L.91C Core Science Lab
4 credits | Online | MTW 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. | Summer II
Required Lab section for CORE .101

CORE.102.91C Structures of Power
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
This course, which is taught primarily by faculty from the Departments of History & American Studies and Politics & International Relations, investigates the roots of current democratic thought through the study of primary source material dating from antiquity to the present. Other sources of inquiry may include scholarly analyses, films and documentaries, and works of the imagination including literature and art. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain, evaluate and critique the key concepts from these primary source readings and demonstrate how these concepts are expressed in the modern world. Special attention will be paid to the student's ability to apply this knowledge to such topics as political institutions, activism and national identity.

CORE.103.91C Human Behavior in Perspective
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
A study of the individual in society, this course draws from disciplines such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology in order to demonstrate the idea that multiple perspectives and frames of reference broaden our understanding of specific behaviors. A focus on cultural diversity will be a central feature throughout the course.  The course also proposes a model for critical thinking about human behavior in general.  Students explore the limitations of a single point of view and the benefits of information derived from multiple vantages as they consider key existential questions: Who am I? What can I know? And, based on what I know, how should I act? 

CORE.104.91C Literature Philosophy & Examined Life
4 credits | Online | MWF 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. | Summer II
This course explores the examined life through three basic questions that shape human experience: Who am I? What can I know? What should I do? Readings, discussions, and questions foster critical reflection and emphasize connections not only between literature and philosophy but also among disciplines such as art, history, psychology, and in response to philosophical and literary works. Currently Platos Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito, are common readings.

CORE.105.91C Aesthetics: Art Impulse 
3 credits | Online | TTh 9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. | Summer III
This course examines a variety of masterworks and artists from the western traditions of art, dance, music, and theater. The course situates art and artists in historical perspective, emphasizes Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism and relates them to contemporary modes of expression. Works of art will be presented in context, so the impact of historical circumstance and cultural expectation on the creative artist will be apparent. Students will respond through oral and written analysis to masterworks studied in class and to works experienced at outside performances. While all sections of the course will include historic masterworks from the fields of art, theater, dance, and music, specific content of individual sections will reflect the interests and expertise of the professor. Throughout the semester, we also examine the work and ideas we study in order to explore the role, meaning and implications of questions that have shaped the human experience: Who am I? What can I know? How should I act?

CORE.430.G1 Special Topics: Propaganda Methods
3 credits | Germany | June 7 - June 29
Prerequisites: CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing. A variable-content Core Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar that builds upon the foundation of the five-course interdisciplinary Core. Each offering addresses a topic of recognized academic and educational significance, situates the topic in interdisciplinary contexts, makes connections between the domains of the freshman-sophomore Core, pursues inquiry into the course topic and its context through primary, substantive and Representative texts, and organizes the Seminar Topic according to one or more of the following schemes: great ideas, cultures, figures, or works (Western and/or non-Western).

CORE.450.91C The People/Their Planet
3 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I
Prerequisites: CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing Artists, poets, novelists, filmmakers, photographers, scientists, historians and policymakers all attend to the relationships between people and their natural surroundings. Those in the creative arts tend to focus on the glory of nature often with little reference to, or even a conscious avoidance of, the role people play in nature; those in the social and physical sciences examine humanity's increasingly intrusive interactions with nature. In this course we will investigate the place of humans in nature through the lens of multiple disciplines. We will read selections from nature writers and poets, including Wait Whitman, Annie Dillard, Barr Lopez, Edward Abbey and W.S. Merwin. Photographers Ansel Adams and Galen Rowell and the painters of the Hudson River school will join these writers to draw our attention to the complexity, beauty and interrelatedness of the natural world. The work of scientists, historians and policy analysts will serve as a counterpoint to these works as they draw out attention to the negative impact of human activity on the natural world.

CORE.451.GR1 It's All Greek to Us
3 Credits | Greece | May 22 - June 6
Prerequisite: CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing  A Core Senior Seminar tracing the origins of the modern world back to its Greek roots. It is from the Greeks, more than from any other source, that the western world traces its origins. Our religions, our science, our literature, our philosophy, our artistic and dramatic forms, and our governmental concepts are all reflections (or, in some cases, rejections) of ideas and practices that can be traced to the world of the ancient Greeks (Hellenic and Hellenistic). This course will study those enduring traditions. Readings include The Iliad, The Wine-dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter, and selections from Greek history, drama, and philosophy.

CORE.453.91C Obsession:Understanding
3 credits | Online | TWTh 1 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Summer III
Prerequisite: CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing. Obsession appears to be a human trait that showcases the best and worst of human possibility. It is from obsession that great works of art can be produced, and from obsession that great thoughts and world changing technologies are born. Obsession is also at the root of some of the worst of humankind. This course engages in an interdisciplinary investigation of what obsession is, how it can affect history and culture, and how it is portrayed in literature and fine art. By the conclusion of the course we will have a better understanding of how one person's obsession can mean so much to the greater collective, and sometimes even change the course of how we will know the world.

CORE.462.91C Sexual Identities
3 credits | Online | TWThF 1 p.m. - 4:10 p.m. | Summer I
This course explores the private and public dimensions of sexual identity from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Students examine how sexual identities are shaped by historical, social, and cultural factors and how sexual identities affect an individual's relationship to community, the state, the law, medicine, etc. Course texts are drawn from the fields of history, psychology, sociology, legal studies, biology, philosophy, literature, cinema, fine art, feminist theory, critical race theory, gay and lesbian studies, queer theory, and transgender studies.

CORE.468.91C Language and Society
3 credits | Online | MWF 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer II
This course will examine language usage from a wide range of the human experience, including science, history, psychology, sociology, politics, business, media, philosophy, literature, and art. Language is like air and water - essential for human life, but, because it's all around us all the time, people tend to take it for granted, until its well being is threatened. So, humans must be thoughtful and ethical users and caretakers of language. Three core questions serve as the foundation and guide for the course: Who am I? What can I know? Based on what I can know, how shall I live?

CORE.490.IT1 The Italian Artistic Impulse
3 credits | Italy | May 17 - June 4
An immersive, hands-on, active learning study abroad program, we will travel to two cities in northern Italy: Alba and Venice, spanning a period of nearly three weeks. This course investigates the intersecting histories and methodology as found in the domains of music, wine, coffee, and food; most specifically as it relates to Italian culture and, and more broadly, the relationship and impact on western history. As part of our interrogation, we will visit many important historical and cultural sites, engage with the musicians and composers of our time by attending musical events (concerts, lectures, masterclasses) as part of the Alba Music Festival, and explore the history and tradition of winemaking, food-culture, and coffee-culture as we find in northern Italy through visits to wineries, restaurants, and cafes. The promotional course website may be found here: https://rwualbavenice.weebly.com/

CPS.101.91C Internship & CP Seminar
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Preparedness is key when seeking and obtaining an internship, professional job or graduate school acceptance. This 10-week Internship & Career Planning Seminar will enhance students' understanding of the following: Personal Branding Materials, Job/Internship Search, Internship Registration, Networking Digital Identity & LinkedIn, Interview Skills, Application Process, Professional Expectations, Budgeting & Negotiation, Career Values and more.

CULST.372.91C Evolution of Teens in Films
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Fulfills a requirement in the Cultural studies major, minor and core concentration This variable topics course will explore the significance and impact of material and/or popular culture in American life and culture, past and present. Each section of the course will focus on a specific topic and/or interpretation of these elements of the American experience, individually or in combination with each other. This is a variable content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

EDU.380.91C Special Topics: Bridges & Books
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
This course will help you reimagine engineering using the science and engineering practices and high-quality children’s literature. During this course, we will use the engineering design process to solve problems for characters using easily accessible materials showcasing a creative way to integrate engineering and literacy in an elementary classroom. Bridges and Books will be offered asynchronously online with optional opportunities to meet with the instructor and peers on zoom. This course is suitable for incoming and undergraduate students in elementary education as well as working teachers. The topics we will cover in this course include the engineering design process, novel engineering, grading and rubrics, lesson plan writing, and classroom management.

EDU.380.92C Special Topics: Dig Tools Emotional Learning
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
This summer online course will give education students the tools necessary to support social emotional learning in classrooms and online. This course will explore best practices, strategies, and resources for supporting social emotional needs in K-12 classrooms. Education students who enroll in this course will leave with a compilation of resources and tools that can be used in student teaching placements.

EDU.380.93C Special Topics: Gamification to Motivate
3 credits | Online | MTWTh 11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. | Summer III
In-depth study of some aspect of education. Specific focus varies from semester to semester. Provides an advanced level of course work or research in education. May be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once.

EDU.380.94C Special Topics: Global Learners
3 credits | Online | TTh 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. | Full Session
The study of educational systems abroad provides a global perspective to educational issues faced by U.S. schools and prepares students to be global citizens in our diverse world. This course provides students the opportunity to explore successful educational systems on a global scale, as well as the opportunity to engage with individuals from an international partner school. Through case studies, research, and experiential learning opportunities, students will study successful educational systems and reflect on their ability to integrate components of thriving global schools into their local communities and classrooms. During the first week of class, students will be CITI trained in research ethics and learn about the IRB process for research, as part of their interaction with our partner school makes them eligible to use their coursework in current department research.

FILM.101.91C Introduction to Film Studies
3 credits | Online | T 6 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. | Full Session
Fulfills a course requirement in the Film Studies minor.  This course provides an introduction to the development of film forms, styles, and theories providing a basic aesthetic and social understanding of film as both a mode of communication and a means of artistic expression. It explores the interrelationship of visual design, motion, editing, and thematic significance, helping students develop the foundational skills with which to interpret and articulate the myriad ways in which films create meaning, and elicit responses within viewers. The ultimate objective of the course is for students to become acquainted with a variety of film forms/styles, while developing the basic skills necessary to analyze and evaluate the cinematic presentations.

FILM.200.91C Global History of Film
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite: FILM 101 This is a survey course that introduces students to the major developments in global film history. The course examines moments in film history that are particularly relevant to the medium's development as an aesthetic form, industrial product, and cultural practice. The overall focus of the course is on how a variety of national film industries, movements and styles not only developed separately, but influenced one another, making an array of important contributions to what is quickly becoming a truly "Global" film culture.

FREN.202.91C Intermediate French II
3 credits | Online | TWTh 9 a.m. - 10 a.m. | Full Session
Fulfills a course requirement in the Modern Language Core Concentration. Prerequisite: Placement by examination or successful completion (C- or higher) of the appropriate Intermediate Language I course. Not open to native speakers of the language studied.  Continuation of Intermediate Language I. Students are expected to achieve a functional level of fluency. Activities for the course include extensive Internet use for class discussion of world events and extended use of the Language Lab.

GER.101.91C Elementary German I
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I

GER.102.91C Elementary German II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III

HIST.100.91C Making Global History
3 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer I
Prerequisite: Fulfills a course requirement in the History Core Concentration Making Global History challenges students to think beyond their western experience. With so much interplay between regional and world cultures, individuals are naturally shaped by events thousands of miles away. This is an introductory course that considers 'other' histories and how they shape our and others' lives. We are aware of the British empire, but what about the Zulu empire? American sports culture and its nationalist undertones relate directly to attributes of China's 19th-century Boxers. HIST 100 will encourage students to recognize these relationships and consider their broader historical meaning.

HIST.283.91C Survey of Latin American History
3 credits | Online | MWF 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. | Summer II
Prerequisite - HIST 100 or consent of instructor. Fulfills a course requirement in the History Core Concentration. This course presents a synthesis of the historical development of Latin America from the Pre-Columbian era to the present. The course is organized in chronological fashion and examines topics such as Pre-Columbian states, the colonial period, the movement for independence, and neocolonialism. 

HIST.345.91C Pirates Sailors & Whalers
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: HIST 100, or consent of instructor.ýFulfills a course requirement in the History Core Concentration. Atlantic history links the Americas, Europe, and Africa to explore the ways in which people, goods, and ideas traversed the Atlantic Ocean. The course connects both hemispheres: eastern and western; northern and southern. As the dominant organizing principle for the early modern period, Atlantic history moves beyond national boundaries and anachronistic applications of later political divisions The course content is variable, but possible offerings include "Pirates, Sailors, and Whalers in the Atlantic World" and "Witchcraft in the Atlantic World." This course may be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic in Atlantic History only once.

HIST.380.92C D&D Magic Gathering
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
This course challenges the modern assumption that history is fact and myth is unverified legend. Focusing on the importance of myth to human life, students will analyze mythological growth within various ancient and modern cultures. They will learn to discern the components of myth, fable, and fantasy that reflect the concerns of the period within which theses genres were born as well as comprehend an existential truth that myth and mythmaking (mythopoeia) are integral parts of humanity's longing, offering "hope without guarantees." This is a variable content course and may be repeated for credit, but students may studyýa single topic only once. Topics may include From Myth to Fantasy, A History of Middle Earth, Narnia and Christianity, Gods Heroes and Monsters, Mesopotamian Myths and Legends, The Wheel of Time, The Truth of Malazan, Vampires and Werewolves from Folklore to Buffy, Heroes Superheroes and Muggles among others.

HIST.384.91C Perspective : Assyrian Culture & History
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: HIST 100 (for Majors), or consent of instructor Fulfills a course requirement in the History Major, Minor, or Core Concentration Each semester this course is offered, a critical period or topic in the history of the Middle East shall be explored. Non-nation specific topics may include Myth and Mesopotamia which will relate the history of Mesopotamia through the myths of Gilgamesh, Enumma Elish, Adapa to name a few; Indigenous and Minoritized in the Middle East will attempt to define the term minority and highlight the history of Armenians, Assyrians, Jews, Kurds, Yezidis, Ahwazis among others; History of Middle Eastern Religions would look at the history and tenets of Judaism, Eastern Christianity, and Islam as well as lesser-known religions including Zoroastrianism, Yezidism, Bahaism, and Druzism; The History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict will work to uncover the historical, cultural and social concerns of such ongoing discord and exploring possibilities for peace. This course may be repeated for credit, but students may not study the same subject more than once. 

IDS.210.31C Effective Speaking Across Audiences
3 credits | Providence Campus | 6:15 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Full Session
This class is designed to give the University College student experience in the practice of researching, preparing, analyzing, and delivering public and personal presentations most often found in the workplace. One of the primary focuses of this course is to connect the role and practice of public speaking to students' current or future career goals. The course frames public speaking from a real world, professional approach. The interplay between audience analysis and speaker goals, and the development of personal style is emphasized. Assignments are relevant to adult learners and/or students in the professional world/ workplace. Various types of oral presentations in a variety of settings including interviews, small groups, board meetings, public forums and computer-enhanced speaking opportunities are explored. Students will ultimately gain confidence in their ability to organize and prepare clear, concise and interesting oral presentations to multiple stakeholders needed to meet current and future career goals.

IDS.210.91C Effective Speaking Across Audiences
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session

ITAL.350.91C Advanced Topics: Italian American Experience
3 credits | Online | TWTh 9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. | Summer III
Fulfills a course requirement in the Modern Language Major, Minor and Core Concentration. Prerequisite: Placement by examination or successful completion (C- or higher) of the appropriate Intermediate II language course Advanced Topics is a variable content course designed to explore areas of language study outside of the scope of literature. Topics include linguistics, European literary criticism, and business. Unless otherwise noted, this course is taught in the target language, and a high level of proficiency is expected. The topic covered each semester is listed in the Course Bulletin. This course may be repeated for credit, but students must study a different topic each time this course is offered.

MUSIC.161.91C The Art of Rock & Roll
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Fulfills a requirement for the Music Minor and Core Concentration. This course does not count for the Music Major. This course explores the history, music, and cultural impact of rock and roll from the 1940s to the present. In involves the student in critical listening and analysis of the fundamental elements of music and technology used in the changing styles of rock and roll.

SCS.430.91C Special Topics in Continuing Studies
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
A Special Topic allows students to engage in courses that cut across concentration offerings in the School of Continuing Studies. These courses can be inter/intra disciplinary or multi-disciplinary. They offer students the opportunity to: intentionally and thoughtfully examine modern day issues through multiple, cross-cutting lenses; work within or across disciplines to solve problems; engage in critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgements and practice.

SUST.430.91C Special Topics: Permaculture
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
Prerequisite:  SUST 101. Permaculture is the design of food systems and social structures to provide for human needs while restoring ecosystem health. This course will offer a foundation in permaculture history, principles, ethics, design process and application of permaculture design methodology and best practices for whole systems design. The course integrates both research and practical applications to design food systems, and social and economic systems that have the resiliency of natural ecosystems.  Examining the interconnections between environmental, social and economic components, permaculture is informed by the disciplines of systems ecology, ecological design and ethno-ecology. The essential components of diverse food production systems will be discussed in detail, including:, patterns in nature, food forests, water harvesting, carbon farming, natural building, land restoration techniques and appropriate technology. 

WTNG.100.91C Intro to Academic Writing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course does not fulfill University Core Curriculum writing requirements. Focusing on the connection between reading and writing, this first-year course emphasizes the development of academic arguments. In a series of increasingly complex assignments, students cultivate rhetorical and writing process knowledge as well as an understanding of the general expectations of the academic discourse community. Assignments focus on summary and analysis of academically oriented texts. Students must write a series of compositions, submit a satisfactory portfolio, and earn a C- or higher in the course to enroll in WTNG 102.

WTNG.102.41C How Writing Works
3 credits | Providence Campus | 6:15 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Full Session
Prerequisite: Placement in WTNG 102 or successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 100. Fulfills one of the two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program. Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor  This first-year course helps students develop a conceptual map of how writing works by building their rhetorical and writing-process knowledge and by fostering genre and discourse community awareness. Students draft a minimum of four revised essays and complete a course portfolio. Students must submit a satisfactory portfolio and earn a C- or higher in the course in order to enroll in a 200- or 300-level WTNG course.

WTNG.102.91C How Writing Works
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisite: Placement in WTNG 102 or successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 100. Fulfills one of the two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program. Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor  This first-year course helps students develop a conceptual map of how writing works by building their rhetorical and writing-process knowledge and by fostering genre and discourse community awareness. Students draft a minimum of four revised essays and complete a course portfolio. Students must submit a satisfactory portfolio and earn a C- or higher in the course in order to enroll in a 200- or 300-level WTNG course.

WTNG.220.41C Critical Writing for Professions
3 credits | Providence Campus | 6:15 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Full Session
Prerequisite: Placement in WTNG 102 or successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 100. Fulfills one of the two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program. Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor    A research-based course, Critical Writing for the Professions focuses on the guidelines for persuasive writing commonly used in business and industry: how to write for specific audiences, choose the appropriate style, design effective document formats, and use visuals to help achieve a documents purpose. The course emphasizes the composition of such professional documents as letters, proposals, and analytical reports.

WTNG.220.91C Critical Writing for Professions
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisite: Placement in WTNG 102 or successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 100. Fulfills one of the two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program. Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor    A research-based course, Critical Writing for the Professions focuses on the guidelines for persuasive writing commonly used in business and industry: how to write for specific audiences, choose the appropriate style, design effective document formats, and use visuals to help achieve a documents purpose. The course emphasizes the composition of such professional documents as letters, proposals, and analytical reports.

WTNG.240.91C Writing for Business Organization
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
Fulfills the second of two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program. Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor. This course explores the causes of the success or failure of business communications. The course takes a case-based approach. Students will study the theory and practice of business communications as a pragmatic enterprise to accomplish actual change in the world. The course includes the study of the nature of domestic and global business communication, the causes and effects of communication failures, the social, legal, and ethical nature of professional communication, and the problems in determining the professional interests of readers.

ACCTG.201.91C Accounting I: Financial
3 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I
A study of the fundamentals of accounting, with an emphasis on the use of economic data in the decision-making process. Topics covered include: forms of business organizations, financing options, and financial statement analysis. The ability to analyze financial statements is the overall goal of this course.ýTopics include inventory, property (plant and equipment/natural resources/intangibles), liabilities, stockholder equity, investments, statement of cash flows.(3 credits) Fall, Spring

ACCTG.310.91C Fraud Examination
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
Stresses the usefulness- and limitations-of accounting data as a measurement of managerial performance and future planning. Emphasizes attention- directing and problem-solving functions of accounting in relation to current planning and control, evaluation of performance, special decisions, and long-range planning.

ACCTG.202.91C Accounting II: Managerial
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Continuation of Accounting 201. Topics include plant assets; long-term investments; long-term debt; contributed capital, retained earnings; dividends; other elements of stockholder equity; treasury stock and EPS.

ACCTG.310.IT2 Fraud Examination
3 credits | Italy | July 31 - August 24
Stresses the usefulness- and limitations-of accounting data as a measurement of managerial performance and future planning. Emphasizes attention- directing and problem-solving functions of accounting in relation to current planning and control,  evaluation of performance, special decisions, and long-range planning.

BUSN.305.91C Legal Environment of Business I
3 credits | Online | MTh 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. | Summer III
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Examines the major areas of law that concern contemporary business decision-makers. The law is placed in its historical, social and business context. Topics include an introduction to the legal system, contracts, government regulation of business, torts, product liability, employment and consumer law.

ECON.111.91C Principles of Microeconomics
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
An introduction to the modern market economy as a system of dealing with the problem of scarcity and choices made by individuals and businesses. Topics include resource allocation, price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, various market structures, market failure, government intervention and comparative advantage. The basic tools of microeconomic analysis will be applied to topics of current interest such as minimum wage legislation and competition policy. Students who have completed Econ 102 will not receive credit for Econ 111

ECON.112.91C Principles of Macroeconomics
3 credits | Online | MWF  9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I
An introduction to the study of the national economy. The measurement, causes, and implications of inflation, unemployment, and recessions are examined, as are the effects of government fiscal and monetary policies. Topics covered include the Keynesian and Classical theories of output and price determination, the Federal Reserve System, and the application of macro theories to events of current interest. Students who have completed Econ 101 will not receive credit for Econ 112.

FNCE.380.91C Principles/Technical Analysis
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
This course focuses on the study of short-term and long-term decision making in the context of portfolio management using the basic principles of technical analysis.  Incorporating the latest financial platforms in the Center for Advanced Financial Education, students will achieve a deep understanding of charting techniques to make better buy/sell decisions in security markets, while applying this knowledge to portfolio and risk analysis. 

FNCE.430.91C Special Topics: Advanced Portfolio Analysis
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Selected topics in advanced course work or research in finance.

FNCE.450.91C Portfolio Analysis
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite: FNCE 325 Detailed study of advanced investment topics using tools and software available in the Center for Advanced Financial Education (CAFÉ) in the Gabelli School. 

MGMT.200.91C Principles of Management
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Analysis of general management, organizations, and organizational behavior. Emphasizes the managers accountability for efficient and effective performance, which includes responsibility for making work organizations more fit for human habitation.

MGMT.330.91C Operations Management
3 credits | Online | Th 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Full Session
Prerequisites: MGMT 200 and MATH 124 or BUSN 210 or equivalent.  An introductory course examining concepts and tools for designing, controlling and improving organizational processes. Topics include process analysis, product and service development, quality management, demand and supply planning, inventory control, supply chain management, and facility planning.

MGMT.499.91C Strategic Management
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: Senior Standing. All Business Core courses completed. Business Policy is the capstone, integrative course for graduating business students. This course describes and analyzes strategic management processes, including the micro- and macro-environments, strategic decision-making, implementation, and performance evaluation components. Global challenges and their impact on a variety of organizations are explored. 

MRKT.340.91C International Marketing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite: MRKT 200. Examines the cultural context of international marketing. Introduces students to the approaches used by global organizations to identify and understand markets and develop successful product, promotion, pricing, and distribution strategies.

MRKT.430.91C Special Topics : Facebook Marketing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Facebook is the most popular social media platform, with roughly 2.89 billion monthly active users. More than 200 million small business around the world use Facebook's tools (Facebook, 2021).  In this hands-on course, students will learn how to create and manage successful Facebook and/or Instagram ad campaigns for a brand. We will learn to set up brand pages, analyze target groups, select audience and set budgets, review analytics data to improve the ROI of your Facebook campaigns, and discuss issues surrounding data privacy and security on social media.

POLSC.309.91C Film and Politics
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisite: POLSC 100; or consent of instructor  An examination of the way politics is portrayed in film. The course focuses on how politics is conveyed through the symbolism, iconography, and cultural references in film. The content of each film will be discussed in terms of its political and historical context.

POLSC.430.91C Special Topics : Land Grabs Narcotraffick
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
This interdisciplinary special topics course examines how narcotrafficking organizations appropriate and transform land and the associated socio-cultural, ecological, and political impacts for local communities, especially Indigenous and Afro-descendant communities. The course explores case studies from Guatemala, Honduras, Colombia, and Mexico that highlight these different impacts in context-specific ways.

CJS.105.91C Intro to Criminal Justice
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
An overview of the American criminal justice system. Discusses in detail the individual components of the criminal justice system, including the police, the courts, and corrections. Designed not only to provide basic understanding of our legal system, but also to provoke thinking on key legal and criminal justice issues such as the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws. 

CJS.105.92C Intro to Criminal Justice
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
An overview of the American criminal justice system. Discusses in detail the individual components of the criminal justice system, including the police, the courts, and corrections. Designed not only to provide basic understanding of our legal system, but also to provoke thinking on key legal and criminal justice issues such as the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws.

CJS.150.91C Policing in America
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Review of the history of policing and police functioning with regard to contemporary social issues. Special focus on related research into police functioning.

CJS.308.91C Criminology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisites: CJS 105 Examines classical and contemporary criminological theories, their historical development and empirical basis, as well as their significance to the criminal justice process and the rehabilitation, deterrence, processing, and punishment of offenders.

CJS.407.91C Terrorism
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: CJS 105, CJS 308 This course will cover all aspects of terrorism. It will explore anti- and counter-terrorism methods in depth. Topics will include the organization and operation of terrorists, their goals, financing, exploration and the role of the media. An in-depth examination of the most violent terrorist acts will allow students to gain insight and knowledge of how the acts occurred as well as the errors made that could have prevented them. It will include acts of domestic terrorism including the Bombing of the World Trade Center, Murrah Federal Building, and the violence that is occurring in schools. The class will follow events as they occur and examine the predictions of experts. (3 credits) Spring

CJS.430.91C Special Topics:International Policing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
A broad overview of international policing bodies such as Interpol, Europol and the UNPOL along with their structures, functions, and roles in global policing, peacekeeping, and security context. Discussion of emerging issues on international policing and policing innovations.  Getting a closer look at law enforcement agencies in different countries, and obtaining a global perspective to learn, to compare, and to contribute to broader understanding of how policing function throughout the world.

CJS.469.91C Justice Studies Practicum
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV
Prerequisites: Completion of 60 credits and consent of internship coordinator  The Justice Studies Practicum is a combined field experience and academic seminar course, in which the field component is oriented toward the students career and professional development while the academic component requires students to relate their conceptual classroom learning to practical application in the field. This course may be taken for a maximum of six credit hours and is open to Criminal Justice and Legal Studies majors

LS.430.91C Special Topics : Alternative Dispute Resolution
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
This class will explore the expanding field of alternative dispute resolution processes.  We will address conflict, types of conflicts and causes of conflict.  In considering conflict, will also study the different dispute processes to resolve conflict and the law and ethics that surround these processes.

LS.469.91C Legal Studies Practicum
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV
The Legal Studies Practicum is a combined field experience and academic seminar course in which the field experience is oriented toward the student's career and professional development, while the academic seminar provides students the opportunity to relate, in written form, their classroom work to application in the field.  The LSP 469 Practicum course is required of all legal studies majors as a graduation requirement.

PLS.100.91C Intro Law/Legal Studies
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Introduction to the law and the American legal system. Includes an introduction to legal research, legal writing and analysis, communication skills, law office administration, and legal and professional ethics. Basic concepts of substantive and procedural law, legal terminology, the functions of the courts and the role of attorneys, paralegals and other legal professional, will be stressed.

PLS.101.31C Criminal Law for Paralegal
3 credits | T 4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. | Summer III

PLS.101.91C Criminal Law for Paralegal
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
(Students majoring in Criminal Justice are not permitted to register for this course.)  Analysis of substantive criminal law, federal and state, with emphasis on background of the common law. Includes discussion of general principles of criminal law such as the extent to which the law attributes criminality to acts or omissions; criminal intent; conspiracy; infancy; insanity; drunkenness; special defenses; entrapment, mistake, and ignorance; and specific offenses such as offenses against the person, habitation, property, public peace, and morality.

PLS.120.91C Law in Contemporary Society
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Emphasizes comprehensive understanding of the role of law in today's world, including an overview of American legal institutions, federal, state, and local; the fundamental distinctions between civil and criminal law, common law and statutory law, substantive and procedural law, trial and appellate courts; quasi-judicial agencies and administrative law, current sources of law, and the U.S. Constitution.

PPSS.120.91C Intro to Corrections
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Course satisfies a PPSS Major requirement This course will provide students with an understanding of the evolution of corrections in the United States and the role of adult and juvenile correctional facilities, probation, parole, and diversion programs in public safety. Specific topics will include different philosophies related to deterrence, incapacitation, retribution, restitution, and rehabilitation, the effects of society's standards and norms on corrections, and the future of corrections.

PPSS.130.91C Introduction to Emergency Medical Services
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Course satisfies requirement for PPSS Major This course will provide students with an understanding of the evolution of emergency medical services in the United States and the role of EMS in public safety. Specific topics will include different the effects of social and societal issues on the EMS mission, public health policy, and the future of emergency medical services.

PPSS.200.91C Intro to Public Safety Technology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
public safety. This will include the basic strengths and weaknesses of radio, telecommunications, and computer network structures, legal issues related to emerging technologies, like drones, body worn cameras and GPS tracking devices, public safety dispatch, records management, and mobile reporting systems, and Automated Electronic Defibrillator technology.

PLS.211.31C Legal Research & Writing III
3 credits | T 6:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer III

PLS.221.31C Law of Contracts
3 credits | M 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer III

PLS.222.31C Law of Business Organization
3 credits | Th 6:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer III

PLS.310.31C Litigation I 
3 credits | Th 4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. | Summer III

PLS.401.91C Paralegal Internship
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session

PLS.430.91C Special Topics: Entertainment Law
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session

PLS.430.92C Special Topics: Movies and the Law
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I

PPSS.450.91C Public Safety Capstone
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Course satisfies requirement for PPSS Major This course synthesizes public safety concepts and perspectives covered in the core PPSS courses. Students will analyze real-world examples of the application of principles covered in these courses. Students will also explore current theoretical approaches and trends within the field of public safety.

SEC.100.91C Computer Hardware
3 credits | Online | Summer II
This course introduces the fundamentals of personal computer (PC) hardware. 

SEC.215.91C Cloud Computing Fundamentals
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
This is an introductory course that introduces students to the fundamental concepts related to the use of cloud computing.  The course covers material related to the technologies, configurations, security issues, and approaches that are used with cloud services and offers students the opportunity to begin working with various cloud components.

SEC.220.91C Database Design and Implementation
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
The course focuses on the design and implementation of relational database systems. It introduces fundamental principles of databases; the relational model (entities and attributes, tables and relationships), conceptual design (primary and foreign keys), data organization strategies (normalization and integrity constraints) and query. Activities focus on building databases, the design process, tools for presenting and critiquing design models and integration with the web.

SEC.300.91C Security Techniques II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite: SEC 200 or permission of the Instructor. This course focuses on the ISACA COBIT methodology used in the exams like CISA and develops the idea of audit and assurance for technology professionals who may be required to oversee, develop, or conduct such audits in compliance with Federal or other legislation which may impact their organization.

SEC.500.91C Intro to Cybersecurity
3 credits | Online | Summer II
This course will introduce new students to cybersecurity terminology, concepts, procedures, and issues. Students will be introduced to both a professional security certification and subject matter covered in greater depth in subsequent courses. Additionally students will be exposed to researching and assessing cyber threats as they pertain to three major avenues of employment in the cybersecurity field: government, business, and law enforcement.

PSYCH.100.91C Intro to Psychology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration Introduction to the basic conceptual approaches through which psychology derives its intellectual form. Emphasis is placed upon the nature of scientific inquiry and its role in obtaining an understanding of human behavior. Exposure to various psychological theories, including Freudianism, behaviorism, social learning, and humanism.

PSYCH.206.91C Psychology of Loss
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration Prerequisite: PSYCH 100 or consent of instructor. Presents the theory and research related to loss. Readings and discussions focus on death, dying, the grieving process and social support, loss and intimate relationships, and growth through loss. In addition, through the completion of a group presentation and research paper, students examine other types of loss such as loss of memory, loss of friendships, loss of dreams or loss of health.

PSYCH.270.91C Positive Psychology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite: Psych 100 This course fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals, families and communities to thrive. The course examines the history of positive psychology, the emergence of research in the field, and the influence of positive psychology on psychotherapy. Self-reflective journaling is a large component of this course. Journal entries include: selfless acts, experiential exercises and reading/viewing reflections.

PSYCH.309.91C Organizational Psychology
3 credits | Online | TWThF | Summer I
Fulfills a requirement in the Psychology major, minor and core concentration Prerequisite/s: PSYCH 100 It is certain that everyone will work  in an organization at some point in life. Organizational Psychology focuses on underlying principles about how people think, feel and behave in organizations.  Organizational Psychology is the study of how individuals relate in the workplace, and how group and organizational structures affect individual behavior. This course is organized around these three levels of focus: individuals, groups (or teams), and organizations.

PSYCH.313.91C Psychology of Infancy
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Does infancy matter?  We don’t even remember our infancy … can such a brief period in our lives have a significant impact?  We will be exploring that question and more in this course, providing an in-depth view of the study of infancy from prenatal development through the toddler years.  The study of infancy is, by its nature, interdisciplinary – we will draw from the fields of psychology, pediatrics, anthropology, sociology, and public health. Special attention will be given to issues that impact society and social policy and address the important question: how can we give infants the healthiest and happiest start to their lives?

PSYCH.314.91C Psychology of Adulthood
3 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration Prerequisite: PSYCH 100 or consent of instructor Considers basic perspectives on adult development. Using the concept of continuing maturation throughout the lifespan, it focuses on the latter portion of human life. Discussions center on changes in intelligence, motivation, learning, and memory which are supposed to accompany aging, as well as the psychology of dying and bereavement, and the psychosocial aspects of growing old. Field work in a retirement center.

PSYCH.326.91C Health Psychology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core concentration Prerequisite: PSYCH 100 Through the lens of psychological research, students in this course will examine the etiology, treatment, and prevention of various medical conditions. Specifically, this course will increase students? understanding of how social, cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and biological factors influence health.

PSYCH.327.91C Psychology of Food and Eating
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
This course explores the psychological processes, theories, and research that surround humanity's complex relationship with food. We will focus on food consumption, advertising, and production from a psychological perspective and discuss how food choices impact our identity and health. We will also discuss different forms of eating-related psychopathology such as eating disorders and binging/purging behavior and review evidence-based treatments for these behaviors. Lastly, we will identify the ways that culture and class-based food choice and availability impact individual and societal health.

PSYCH.390.91C Substance Abuse
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration The course provides a comprehensive review of psychoactive substances. Major classes of drugs are covered in class, including their history, modes of intake, effects, and consequences of use. Distinctions are made between substance use, misuse, abuse, and dependence. Types of education, prevention measures, and treatment approaches are also presented.

PSYCH.513.91C Vocational Counseling
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor This course will provide advanced study in the theory, process and practice of Group Counseling and Psychotherapy. Students will study the application of group designs in the treatment of individuals in a group setting. Multicultural applications of different approaches will be considered, as well as applications of group counseling on specific special populations. Particular attention will be paid to the utility and research supporting the effectiveness and efficacy of this form of treatment.

PSYCH.592.91C Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.592.92C  Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.592.93C Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.592.94C Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.592.95C Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.592.96C Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.592.97C Clinical Practicum II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

PSYCH.593.91C Clinical Practicum III
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

SHS.100.91C Foundations of Social & Health Services
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Examines the historical, philosophical, and theoretical frameworks of professional social and health services in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical bases of developmental psychology, including structural theory, ego psychology and adaptation, object relations, and life cycle development.

BIO.326.M1 Field Ecology of the Rockies
3 credits | Montana | Summer II
Pre-requisite BIO.104 and Lab  This is a field-intensive ecology course to study the various communities found in the Beartooth Mountain region of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem.  We will use the natural laboratory of the Rocky Mountains to teach students various topics in Plant, Community and Ecosystem Ecology.  Students will learn numerous field techniques to understand the structure and the dynamics of the communities.  Topics will include Community properties including population structure, Competition, Succession, Soil Ecology, Riparian woodlands, Disturbance & Fire Ecology, Physiological ecology and Human Impact on the region. Students will learn about Environmental (Regional and National) issues that are impacting the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Fulfills a course requirement in the Biology and Environmental Science Core Concentration.

CHEM.192.01 Principles of Chemistry II
4 credits | Bristol Campus | TWThF 9 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. | Summer III
Fulfills a course requirement in the Chemistry Core Concentration. Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of CHEM 191. CHEM 191 and 192 may be used to fulfill the Core Curriculum requirement in science. Continuation of Chemistry 191L, intended primarily for science majors. Emphasizes thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium concepts, electrochemistry, and some organic chemistry. Laboratory is an integral part of the course.

CHEM.192.91C Principles of Chemistry II
4 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I
Fulfills a course requirement in the Chemistry Core Concentration Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of CHEM 191 CHEM 191 and 192 may be used to fulfill the Core Curriculum requirement in science Continuation of Chemistry 191L, intended primarily for science majors. Emphasizes thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium concepts, electrochemistry, and some organic chemistry. Laboratory is an integral part of the course.

CHEM.192L.51 Principles of Chemistry II Lab
0 credits | Bristol Campus | TTh 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. | Summer III
Co-Requisite Lab for CHEM 192

CHEM.192L.52 Principles of Chemistry II Lab
0 credits | Bristol Campus | WF 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. | Summer III
Co-Requisite Lab for CHEM 192

CNST.475.91C Construction Project Control
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisites: CNST 321, CNST 450 An examination of the activities involved in the effective management of single and multiple construction projects. The course includes the study of basic control theory, the preparation of control models, the collection of actual production data, the computation of project performance, and the determination of appropriate corrective action.

COMSC.110.91C Intro Computer Science I
4 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite: None A broad-based introduction to the core concepts of computer science with an emphasis on program design. Topics include basic algorithms and data structures, recursion, event-handling, and object-oriented concepts. The course employs the Java programming language to develop interactive applets designed to run within the students World Wide Web home page.

COMSC.110L.91C Intro Computer Science I Lab
0 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Required Lab section for COMSC.110

EMS.312.41C EMT Paramedic IV
12 credits | Providence Campus | 6:15 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Full Session
This Program consists of over 172 hours of classroom lecture/didactic and the start of 50 hours of clinical setting training and demonstration of skill. In addition a significant time is spent riding on an approved 911 rescue. It also requires several hours of hospital internship. This Paramedic course helps prepare students for certification as a Paramedic. This course is part four of the four part sequence required for students to sit for the National Paramedic Certification Exam

HCA.413.91C Moral/Ethical Issues Health Care
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Introduces students, currently employed (or intending to be employed) in the health care field, the the moral/ethical issues and dilemmas facing the healthcare industry/employee(s) today and into the future. A sampling of selected topics that will be discussed and researched include: informed consent, euthanasia, rationing of health care services, advance directives, biomedical research, heroic measures, the uninsured and underinsured.

MATH.110.91C Math In The Modern World
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics  Survey of mathematics designed for students who are majoring in non-technical areas. Topics may include problem-solving techniques, an introduction to statistical methods, and an introduction to the mathematics of finance.

MATH.117.91C College Algebra
3 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer II
Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: Placement by examination. Covers linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, polynomials and rational expressions, partial fractions, exponents and radicals, and introduces linear, quadratic, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions.

MATH.117.92C College Algebra 
3 credits | TTh 9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. | Summer IV

MATH.117.93C College Algebra
3 credits | TTh 9 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. | Summer IV

MATH.124.91C Basic Statistics
3 credits | Online | TWThF 9 a.m. - 11:10 p.m. | Summer II
Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics (A student cannot receive credit for both this course and MATH 122.) Emphasizes descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.

MATH.136.91C Precalculus
4 credits | Online | TWF 9 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. | Summer II
Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of MATH 117 or placement by examination. The focus of this course is on functions, which are of central importance in Calculus. Topics include definitions, properties, and applications of algebraic, inverse, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.

MATH.141.91C Finite Mathematics
3 credits | Online | TWTh 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer II
Fulfills the University Core Curriculum Requirement in mathematics. This course is primarily designed for business majors and focuses on building algebraic skills while emphasizing applications, models, and decision-making from business and the social sciences. Topics include linear equations, functions, mathematics of finance, systems of linear equations, matrices, linear inequalities and linear programming.

MATH.213.91C Calculus I
4 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Mathematics Core Concentration. Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of MATH 136 or placement by examination. Covers the differential calculus of a single variable and introduces integration. Topics include limits and continuity, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, application of derivatives to rates of change, optimization, and curve sketching, and the Fundamental Theorem. The laboratory component involves use of computer algebra software.

MATH.213L.91C Calculus I Lab
0 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Required Lab section for MATH.213

MATH.214.91C Calculus II
4 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Mathematics Core Concentration. A student cannot receive credit for both this course and MATH.218. Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of MATH 213. Covers the integral calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions and its applications. Topics include elementary differential equations, computation of areas, volumes, work and other physical quantities, integration techniques, improper integrals, and infinite series. The laboratory component Involves use of computer algebra software.

MATH.214L.91C Calculus II Lab
0 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Required Lab section for MATH.214

MATH.221.91C Discrete Mathematics
4 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Mathematics Core Concentration. Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of MATH 136 or placement by examination. Focuses on concepts that are central to mathematics and computer science and underlie their foundations: logic and valid reasoning, methods of proof including mathematical induction, sets, functions, and relations.Examples may be drawn from number theory, graph theory, combinatorics, or the theory of infinite sets, at the discretion of the instructor.

MATH.315.91C Probability & Statistics
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Fulfills a course requirement in the Mathematics Core Concentration  Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of MATH 214; or consent of instructor  Emphasizes probability, probability density functions, distributions, statistical inferences and estimation, correlation, and regression.

MATH.317.91C Differential Equations
3 credits | Online | TWTh 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer II
Fulfills a course requirement in the Mathematics Core Concentration Prerequisite: Successful completion (C- or higher) of MATH 214; or consent of instructor Studies methods of solution of ordinary differential equations with applications in science and engineering. Extensive use is made of the method of Laplace transforms.

NATSC.402.91C Natural Disasters
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course deals with the natural hazards that pose threats to human life and property, and on the natural disasters and catastrophes that occur when those threats are realized in the form of destructive events.  Topics are presented in an order that is somewhat predicated on timeliness (for example, hurricanes are covered first, while we are in the peak time of "hurricane season") and also on a logical flow of causes and consequences. As part of the science curriculum, this course is also focused on the foundation of science - the Scientific Method and the Process of Science - and how science is applied in the study and analysis of natural disasters, toward the end of preparing for and mitigating the effects of inevitable disastrous events.

PHYS.109.91C Physics I (Algebra)
4 credits | Online | TWTh 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer II
PHYS 109 and 110 may be used to fulfill the Core Curriculum requirement in laboratory science. Note: PHYS 109 lab is co-listed with PHYS 201 lab. Prerequisite:  MATH 136 or higher. An introduction to physics without calculus. Vectors, equilibrium of particles, rectilinear motion, Newton's second law, motion in a plane, work and energy, impulse and momentum, torque, rotational motion, elasticity, periodic motion, fluids, heat and thermodynamics. 

PHYS.109L.91C Physics I Lab (Algebra)
0 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Required Lab section for PHYS.109

PHYS.201.91C Physics I
4 credits | Online |TWTh 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. | Summer II
Prerequisites: MATH 213. PHYS 201 and PHYS 202 fulfills the Core Curriculum requirement in laboratory science.Introduction to physics using calculus. Covers vectors, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, impulse and momentum, torque, rotational motion, elasticity, periodic motion, gravitation, fluids, heat and thermodynamics.

PHYS.201L.91C Physics I
0 credits | Online | Summer II
Required Lab section for PHYS.201

PHYS.202.91C Physics II
4 credits | Online | MWF 9 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. | Summer III
Prerequisite: PHYS 201; Pre- or Co-requisite: MATH 214 PHYS 201 and 202 may be used to fulfill the Core Curriculum requirement in laboratory science Covers fluids, heat and thermodynamics, vibrations and waves, electricity and magnetism, optics, the atomic nucleus and radioactivity.

PHYS.202L.91C Physics II Lab 
0 credits | Online | MWF 11 a.m. - 12:45 a.m. | Summer III
Required Lab section for PHYS.202

TLM.250.91C Lean Manufacturing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Requirement Fulfillment: Core Concentration Note: This course fulfills one of the nine proposed requirements for the BS degree in Technology, Leadership and Management. This course will cover the principles and techniques of lean manufacturing. Major topics covered include lean principles, 5S, value stream mapping, total productive maintenance, manufacturing/office cells, setup reduction/quick changeover, pull system/Kanbans, continuous improvement/Kaizen, lean six sigma, lean simulation, and other modern lean manufacturing techniques and issues.

TLM.430.91C Special Topics 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
In-depth study of some aspect of Technology and Manufacturing Management. Specific focus may vary from semester to semester and may include: Lean Manufacturing, Supply Chain Management, Ethics in Science and Technology, Organizational Change Management, Leadership, etc. May be repeated for credit, but students may study a single topic only once for credit.

Interested in taking one of these graduate courses this summer? To be eligible to take a non-matriculating course or to be considered for admission to a master’s degree or certificate program, you must possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. Non-matriculating students will need to submit the graduate application at grad.rwu.edu/apply and submit a copy of their transcript showing a bachelor’s degree conferred to the Office of Graduate Admission. Transcripts may be emailed to gradadmit@rwu.edu or mailed to the Office of Graduate Admission, Roger Williams University, 1 Old Ferry Rd., Bristol, RI 02809. Permission to take a non-matriculating course or admission to a degree or certificate program is subject to approval by the faculty program director of the intended program or course. Questions? Call the Office of Graduate Admission at 401-254-6200 or email gradadmit@rwu.edu.

ARCH.515.01 Graduate Architectural Design Studio
5 credits | Bristol Campus | TWF 1:30 p.m. - 5:40 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: Completion of ARCH 413 and ARCH.333 Pre or Co-requisite: ARCH.331. Students may select from a number of directed studios in fulfilling the Graduate Architectural Design Studio requirement for the Master of Architecture degree. Offerings at this level are enriched by studios focusing on topics such as urban design, housing, sustainable design, contemporary technologies, interior architecture, historic preservation and others.

CJS.501.91C Criminal Justice System Overview
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV
An analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States, Focusing on the the police, the courts and the corrections system.  Controversial issues facing the justice system are considered in detail.

CJS.510.91C Const Issues Criminal Law
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV
This course focuses on the rights of suspects in criminal procedures. A detailed analysis of individual rights under the Fourth, Fifth, and Eighth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution is developed.

CJS.513.91C Analysis Criminal Justice Data
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV
Prerequisite: CJS 503  An introduction to statistical analysis in the behavioral sciences. The practical application of various analytical techniques to the social sciences and criminal justice research is emphasized.

CJS.528.91C Special Topics: Domestic Violence Theory
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV
This class is an opportunity to look closely at one of the most severe epidemics plaguing the health and welfare of our society: domestic violence.  We will also explore the role of the legal system/criminal justice system in addressing domestic violence issues.

CJS.528.92C Special Topics: Cultural Competency CJ
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

CJS.528.93C Special Topics: White Collar Crime
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer IV

EDU.612.91C Collaboration, Co-Teaching & Consulting
3 credits | Online | Th 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
Virtually every classroom in the United States contains at least one child with a disability, a fact that presents both challenges, and great promise for general education classroom teachers and children alike. The primary emphasis of this course is on how to plan, manage, and evaluate learning effectively in diverse classroom settings, as special educators are increasingly asked to design, consult, and collaborate with general education classroom teachers who must often educate students with disabilities in inclusive settings. To this end, we will review research-based instructional practices appropriate for students with disabilities who are included in general education classroom environments.

EDU.613.91C Cultivating Pro-Social Behavior
3 credits | Online | MTW 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer II
In this course, students will examine current theories of social-emotional development as well as the most prevalent disorders of emotional control and behavioral self-regulation. Our primary focus, however, will be on research-supported strategies for facilitating the development of pro-social behavior in children who struggle with low self-concept, behavioral inhibition, social isolation, and/or reciprocal social interaction.

LEAD.509.31 Negotiation Strategies
3 credits | Providence Campus | T 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
This course covers negotiation as a process. Students will learn the structure and processes of negotiation at both the interpersonal and organizational levels. Knowledge and skills in negotiating is essential to leaders working with and through other people to accomplish objectives. Negotiation is an important part of the normal give and take of any business, government, or nonprofit organization, including negotiating salaries, arranging contracts with vendors, or allocating recourses to a project.

LEAD.530.31 Special Topics: Financial Management
3 credits | Providence Campus | M 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
The purpose of the special topics course is to allow Leadership students to integrate new subject matter into their learning of the field. The special topics course will allow the creation of emerging new areas which will keep students up to date in the field. The course will also examine current issues and problems in the field what will require students to employ the reasoning, speaking and writing skills developed in their other Leadership courses.

LEAD.530.32 Special Topics: Leadership for Change
3 credits | Providence Campus | Th 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV

MRKT.530.91C Special Topics: Customer Relationship Marketing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Customer Relationship Management (CRM) emphasizes using new technology to do business through one-to-one relationships.  We will explore how a customer-focused marketing strategy can be used to harvest the benefits of relationships with the firm’s best customers.  In the process, we will explore the tools used to fine-tune customer acquisition and analyze customer data. 

PA.518.31 Program Evaluation
3 credits | Providence Campus | W 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
Program Evaluation is a research and analysis based course in management, programming and administration. It is intended to equip the student with the knowledge and skill to create, implement and manage a public or health program using modern information systems, and research principles. Program design is featured as an important aspect of evaluation along with matching program effects and the statistical analysis required for understanding the effects. Emphasis is placed on program evaluation being part of the standard MIS/EDP operation of an organization. At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to create a program and see it through to its programmatic conclusion.

PA.530.31 Special Topics: Financial Management
3 credits | Providence Campus | M 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
This is a course for each specialization required of Public Administration Masters Students. Students integrate knowledge in selected specialty areas in the public management, health care administration, leadership, nonprofit executive management, and related public management and service topics. Students will complete assigned readings, conduct seminar discussions, and research, organize, and complete assigned course projects.

PA.530.32 Special Topics: Leadership for Change
3 credits | Providence Campus | Th 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
This is a course for each specialization required of Public Administration Masters Students. Students integrate knowledge in selected specialty areas in the public management, health care administration, leadership, nonprofit executive management, and related public management and service topics. Students will complete assigned readings, conduct seminar discussions, and research, organize, and complete assigned course projects.

PA.553.31 Economy of Health & Medical Care
3 credits | Providence Campus | W 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: PA 551 or consent of instructor  Examination of current issues confronting health care managers. An assessment of current programs and management responses to emerging trends in the health care field, including delivery systems, marketing/competition, strategic planning, financial management and/or epidemiological changes.

PA.590.31 Research in Public Administration 
3 credits | Providence Campus | T 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
Designed for working professionals in the field. The Course is the first phase of the student's capstone completion. It is the foundation for the follow-on course PA 599. PA 599 is the final course in the capstone sequence. 

PA.599.31 Directed Study in Public Administration
3 credits | Providence Campus | T 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer IV
(PA 599 required of all students)  This capstone in public administration is devoted to topics in public management involving problem identification and solution. Students work independently with faculty guidance to create projects in public administration. In-person presentation of data findings and solutions is required.  Internship/Research Requirement and Directed Study Requirement.

PSYCH.503.91C Forensic Psychology 
3 credits | Online | MWF 5 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. | Summer II
Forensic Psychology is the intersection of Psychology and Law. Students will study the most cogent areas where Psychology and Law intersect.ýStudents will exam such topics as: The Historical Development of Forensic Psychology; Child Custody Insanity Issues; Competency evaluation; Police Psychology; Civil Proceedings and the Forensic Psychologists role; Criminal Proceedings; Assessment Issues, Civil and Criminal; Expert Testimony and Interventions with Forensic Populations.

Register

Current RWU Students

You can register for Summer Sessions online through Roger Central, as you would for any other semester. If you have any questions, reach out to your advisor. They are happy to review and discuss potential summer courses with you. 

Roger Central

New RWU Students (Entering Class, Fall 2022)

To learn more about summer offerings, and express interest, please contact Elizabeth Niemeyer, Director of Advising and Peer Mentorship, at eniemeyer@rwu.edu.

Visiting Undergraduate or Pre-College High School Students 

Welcome! If you are not currently enrolled as a student at RWU, register through our University College registration process.

You don't need to fully apply to take a course as a visiting student, but we do need a little bit of information to get you registered.

Fill out our visiting student enrollment form and put the course number/key from above in the appropriate field. If you're not sure which course would be best, just fill in a subject and our admission team can find a course that fits your needs.

Once we have processed your course registration, you will receive an email with your ID number and RWU email. You'll need this to access your course in Bridges, our learning management system.

Undergraduate Visiting Student Registration