Computational Mathematics

When you study Computational Mathematics at RWU, you’ll learn how to apply principles of math to computers and computer science fields. The curriculum emphasizes practical computational methods and use of technology — skills you can apply to solve problems in your future career in the technology industry or the sciences.

Degree Requirements

The Computational Mathematics Minor

Click to Open

This Minor includes courses that emphasize practical computational methods and use of technology applied to problems in industry and the sciences.

Note: Computational Mathematics may not serve as a minor for a Mathematics major.

SubjectNumberTitle
MATH213Calculus I and Lab
MATH214Calculus II and Lab
and four of the following Mathematics courses:
MATH221Discrete Mathematics
MATH255Introduction to Mathematical Software
MATH301Linear Programming
MATH305Mathematical Modeling
MATH317Differential Equations
MATH342Numerical Analysis
or
MATH331Linear Algebra
Student working on equation on blackboard
Cole Foster '20, an engineering and applied math double major, is researching the radiative transfer on the planet Mars using the Weiner Hopf Integral Equation Model.

To read more about our academic offerings, or to view full course descriptions, please refer to our University Catalog.

Research Opportunities

Several factors distinguish Roger Williams University's mathematics programs from the competition. For starters, small class size means more personalized attention from our faculty members. Our students are involved on campus — as math tutors and as members of the Mathematics Honor Society. Unlike at other institutions, our talented students get to co-author math publications with our faculty. In fact, our students are currently working on the Numerical Solution of the Helmholtz Equation for the Pseudosphere, and Foundations of General Relativity and some speculations on the Einstein-Grossmann Collaboration.