Management

As a Management major, you’ll learn how to lead organizations through complex decisions such as budgeting, negotiating, planning and directing. Because these decisions have broad impacts throughout an organization, RWU’s curriculum encourages you to think about dynamics like diversity, ethics and politics in the workplace. Combined with hands-on internship experience, you’ll gain the management skills for a successful career in human resources, purchasing, administrative services, health services, or your own entrepreneurial venture.

The Management Major

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The Management program graduates students who view the problems of enterprise management from a broad perspective and who are sensitive to the impact that management decisions have throughout an organization. The program integrates courses from all critical functional areas. Graduates pursue careers in a vast array of business organizations, large and small, including their own entrepreneurial ventures.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

In addition to satisfying the University Core Curriculum and Business Core requirements, management majors must complete the following courses:
MGMT302Organizational Behavior 
MGMT310Human Resource Management 
MGMT469Management Coop 
Management Electivesfour courses (any Management (MGMT) courses, exclusive of Business Core requirements)
Business/Non-Business Electivestwo courses (any ACCTG, BUSN, FNCE, IB, MGMT or MRKT course, exclusive of Business Core requirements or any other course)

The Management Minor

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The Management minor provides students with an appreciation of the people and managerial skills necessary to ensure productive and satisfied organizational members and the accomplishment of organizational goals.

Requirements

MGMT200Principles of Management 

Five MGMT electives (excluding MGMT 330 and MGMT 499)

A headshot of alumni Jim Kelley

Project Manager

Jim Kelley, RWU Class of 2016 Management

At Roger Williams, learning about leadership can happen both in the classroom and around campus. Jim Kelley is already putting to what he learned to good use.

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