Summer Sessions

Welcome to Summer at Roger Williams University!

There is no better time of year to get ahead or catch up!

Take a look at the wide selection of online classes being offered this Summer. RWU has been offering online classes for years and this year's schedule is more robust than ever before.

Summer 2021LengthStart DateEnd Date
Full Session 10 weeksMay 25thAugust 5th
Summer I3 weeksMay 25thJune 11th 
Summer II 5 weeksMay 25thJune 25th
Summer III 5 weeksJune 21stJuly 23rd
Summer IV 7 weeksJune 21st August 5th
Summer V 5 weeksJuly 6thAugust 5th

Tuition

Online 3-credit undergraduate class tuition: $1,299
Active Military and their spouses 3-credit class tuition: $750 
Additional discounts may be available.
Graduate class tuition varies, view current rates.

Courses Offered

ANSOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session

CD 430 Community-Driven Solutions 
3 credits | Online | MWF, 9 a.m.-11 a.m. | Summer IV 
No Prerequisite. This session of CD 430 will provide students with hands-on useful and applicable experience in journalistic reporting, editing and publishing, using a community-driven approach based on investigative public affairs reporting into solutions for community priorities and humanistic journalism. Students will learn through a project-based, hands-on, live experience how to assess community’s needs, to acquire information and knowledge, investigate available solutions, interview and collaborate with experts, connect with and learn from community members, and produce and distribute news and digital content for publication to improve the lives of local communities. We will specifically work with the Communities of Hope program in the Mt. Hope neighborhood in Providence and in Bristol County, but the skills are transferable to any other community.

CD 220 Issues in Community Development
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session 
Overview of the concepts, theories and applications in the field of community development. This is the foundation course for the Community Development program, but it is appropriate for all students interested in a comprehensive look at the elements required to understand what makes for successful communities, from housing to education, to social services and infrastructure.

CD 351 Sustainable Economic and Community Development
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Explores key subject areas related to sustainable economic development, including business creation and retention, microenterprises, co-ops, job creation, asset development, sector analysis, the connection between economic development and social health. Examines the role that community development professionals can and should play in ensuring that economic development occurs in a sustainable manner.

CD 430 Special Topics in Community Development
3 credits | Online | MWF 6:15 p.m.-9:00 p.m. | Summer IV 
Prerequisites: None.

This session of CD 430 will provide students with hands-on useful and applicable experience in journalistic reporting, editing and publishing, using a community-driven approach based on investigative public affairs reporting into solutions for community priorities and humanistic journalism. Students will learn through a project-based, hands-on, live experience how to assess community’s needs, to acquire information and knowledge, investigate available solutions, interview and collaborate with experts, connect with and learn from community members, and produce and distribute news and digital content for publication to improve the lives of local communities. We will specifically work with the Communities of Hope program in the Mt. Hope neighborhood in Providence and in Bristol County, but the skills are transferable to any other community.

CD 521 Social Theories Community Based Pr
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session

COMM 210 Introduction to Public Speaking
3 credits | Online |TWTH, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | Summer II 
Does not satisfy a requirement in the Global Communication core concentration. Emphasizes effective speaking techniques for public as well as everyday situations. Focuses on identifying, organizing, and presenting facts, opinions, and values to a variety of audiences.

COMM 210 Introduction to Public Speaking
3 credits | Online | TWTH, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. | Summer II 
Does not satisfy a requirement in the Global Communication core concentration. Emphasizes effective speaking techniques for public as well as everyday situations. Focuses on identifying, organizing, and presenting facts, opinions, and values to a variety of audiences.

COMM 210 Introduction to Public Speaking
3 credits | Online | MWF, 9a.m.-12 p.m. | Summer V 
THIS WILL BE A SECTION RESTRICTED TO INCOMING STUDENTS. 

COMM 210 Introduction to Public Speaking 
3 credits | Online |  T, 6 p.m.-9.30 p.m. | Full Session 

CORE 101 Scientific Investigations
4 credits | Online | MW, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | Summer IV
No prerequisite. This interdisciplinary course explores important issues of societal and personal relevance by evaluating testable ideas through experimentation and literature-based research in lecture and laboratory settings. Students will use the process of science to generate data and synthesize new ideas to come to evidence-based conclusions that will illuminate responses to the three core questions: Who am I, what can I know, and given what I know, how should I act? Lecture content will vary across sections to reflect the expertise of instructors from the breadth of scientific disciplines including astronomy, biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, oceanography, physics, public health, and sustainability studies, among others. The laboratory experience complements the lecture by providing students with hands-on opportunities to use the scientific method as they lead their own research investigations.

CORE 101L Scientific Investigations Lab
0 credits | Online | TTH, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

CORE 104 Literature, Philosophy, and the Examined Life
3 credits | Online |  W, 1 p.m.-4:30 p.m. | Full Session 
No prerequisite. In this course we will make connections between early medieval literary and philosophical texts and the examined life as it was conceived and lived in the Age of the Vikings (circa 800-1100 CE), with a special focus on ethics. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to demonstrate an understanding of significant literary and philosophical themes and concepts presented in course texts, such as: the origins of English literature in the Oral Tradition; conventions of Anglo-Saxon poetic composition; the form and purpose of the Saga tradition; the Viking code of virtues; the Nordic wisdom tradition; and the syncretism of native and Christian beliefs and practices. 

CULST 370 Vigilante Women
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
No prerequisite. This course examines vigilante women in life and fiction. Over the past ten years, in response to the global epidemic of violence against women, groups of vigilante women have emerged in India, Nigeria, and Mexico to fight back against corrupt institutions, systems, and leaders who do not protect women and girls against violence.  These groups claim an ethical legitimacy of their use of violence in response to ineffective and nonresponsive judiciaries. Furthermore, vigilante women in fiction provide a space where violent responses to violence against girls and women can be liberatory, freeing them from the shackles of violent men, or other patriarchal constraints. In particular, this course considers whether or not vigilante violence can be wielded toward feminist ends.  This is complicated terrain, because vigilantism utilizes threat, force, and violence, and historically many feminists have named those as weapons of the patriarchy.  But when women claim those acts for agency and empowerment, and use them for the collective betterment of their communities, the feminist potential for vigilante women becomes a moral possibility worthy of deeper examination. Using memoir, journalism, photography, film, television, fiction, poetry, and young adult literature as our objects of analysis, students will leave this course understanding vigilantism, feminism, and what is at stake when vigilante women act on behalf of girls and women who are left vulnerable despite the systems and laws that have been designed to protect them.

CULST 372 Queer Visual Culture
3 credits | Online |  MWF, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | Summer III
Do you want to learn how to death drop? Do ever wonder why LGBTQ people drink iced coffee all year no matter the weather? Why is Babadook a bisexual icon? Did Taylor Swift really need to have a trailer park as the setting for her “You Need to Calm Down” music video? Find out the answers to these questions and more in the 5-week Cultural Studies summer course: Queer Visual Culture. Queer visual culture, as a counterculture to more mainstream visual cultures, offers ways for queer subjects to represent themselves and come to understand who they are. Throughout this course, we will use a combination of feminist media studies, queer studies, and critical race studies to explore a variety of media such as TV shows, films, zines, activist posters, TikToks and more. To do so, cultivates a queer lens with which we interrogate how meaning is inscribed onto and through queer bodies. We will travel through time and space from the early twentieth century to our current moment and beyond, and ultimately seek to describe what queer visual representation is – and perhaps is not – today. Please note that this course will virtually meet twice a week, incorporating a mixture of synchronous and asynchronous work. There are no pre-requisites for this course. 

CORE 430 Money, Money
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m.
Core seminar, required for graduation CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing. Money is a powerful force. It is the foundation of the world’s financial system and fuels the world economy. From the early stages of cacao beans and shells to coins and from early banking to electronic cash, money is essential to the global economy and serves both as a medium of exchange and a method of accounting.  Money defines culture, fuels wars, negotiates treaties, and defines relationships among countries. Money is present in every corner of our lives – we earn it, we spend it, manage it and often obsess over it, but how well do we really understand it? This course will take an expansive look at money throughout history and will examine its powerful influence on the arts, culture, religion, crime, politics, and the individual psyche. We will consider how money has influenced our own history, politics, and the role it plays in current democratic thought. We will study the psychology of money and the impact it has on culture and human behavior. It will look at the role of banks, taxes, and trade from Ancient Rome to the Renaissance to modern day. The course will conclude by considering the Euro and the psychological impact of changing the currency of a country, the future of digital money, and the feasibility of a global currency.  

CORE 451 It's Greek to Us
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 1 p.m.-4:10 p.m. | Summer I
Core seminar, required for graduation CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing. A Core Senior Seminar tracing the origins of the modern world back to its Greek roots. It is from the Greeks, more than from any other source, that the western world traces its origins. Our religions, our science, our literature, our philosophy, our artistic and dramatic forms, and our governmental concepts are all reflections (or, in some cases, rejections) of ideas and practices that can be traced to the world of the ancient Greeks (Hellenic and Hellenistic). This course will study those enduring traditions. Readings include The Iliad, The Wine-dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter, and selections from Greek history, drama, and philosophy.

CORE 456 TheInternet and the Digital Revolution
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
Core seminar, required for graduation CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing. Social commentators in the humanities and sciences have characterized our age of disruptive change as the “Knowledge Revolution”, “Third Industrial Revolution”, or the “Information Revolution”. The clearest example of these changes lies in the Internet with its gargantuan storehouse of data, terrestrial ubiquity, and vast communication reach. Creating and disseminating digital data is the keystone to this revolution. This course examines the origins of the internet, from Jacquard’s loom of the 1840 to the World Wide Web of today, from Morse’s communication with coded pulses to the interlinked fiber optic networks, and from the barter of goods in the marketplace to eBay and iTunes. The course examines the ramifications of these technologies through texts on areas such as the arts, science, education, culture, privacy, crime, national security, the economy, gaming and politics. Participants are expected to lead and participate in seminar discussions on these topics. Participants are expected to have access to the internet, through either a computer or smartphone.

CORE 469 Great Power/Great Responsibility
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 1 p.m.-4:10 p.m. | Summer I 
Core seminar, required for graduation CORE 101 through CORE 105 and at least sixth semester standing. In this course students will engage with primary superhero/graphic novel texts and secondary critical theory drawn from the fields of psychoanalysis, film studies, philosophy, queer theory, critical race theory, feminist theory, science, aesthetics, religion and politics to explore distinct superhero identities that reflect certain marginalized groups and notions of “other” and understand the many ways in which the genre spills into several academic fields of study.

EDU 380 Bridges and Books: Reimagining Engineering Through Children's Literature
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer V
Cross-listed with EDU 530. No prerequisite. Have you ever wondered how you can combine engineering with children’s books? This course will help you imagine engineering in a different way using the science and engineering practices and high quality children’s literature. During this course, we will use the engineering design process to solve problems for characters using easily accessible materials showcasing the creative way to integrate engineering and literacy in an elementary classroom. 

EDU 380 Case Study: Refugee Youth
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
No prerequisite. A look at current events in education. This course will look at the refugee experience and educational needs of refugee youth, particular to resettled youth in the US. Open to all students, no education background needed. Purpose: Providence is a refugee resettlement site, and as such, settles sizable numbers of refugee youth. Refugee youth have particular needs regarding their education. This course will look at the refugee experience from leaving their country of origin through their schooling experiences in the US. A good course for students interested in international affairs, equity and diversity, social justice and contemporary social issues. While we will look at educational needs of refugee youth, this also had relevance to those who will teach/work with immigrants and emergent bilinguals (English learners). We will also look at how the refugee process works in the US and the ways in which contemporary politics are impacting that process. This class will be asynchronous, to best accommodate all learners.

EDU 530 Bridges and Books: Reimagining Engineering Through Children's Literature
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer V
Cross-listed with EDU 380. No prerequisite. Have you ever wondered how you can combine engineering with children’s books? This course will help you imagine engineering in a different way using the science and engineering practices and high quality children’s literature. During this course, we will use the engineering design process to solve problems for characters using easily accessible materials showcasing the creative way to integrate engineering and literacy in an elementary classroom. 

FILM 101 Introduction to Film Studies 
3 credits | Online | W, 6 p.m.-9:30 p.m. | Full Session 
No prerequisite. This course provides an introduction to the development of film forms, styles, and theories providing a basic aesthetic and social understanding of film as both a mode of communication and a means of artistic expression. It explores the interrelationship of visual design, motion, editing, and thematic significance, helping students develop the foundational skills with which to interpret and articulate the myriad ways in which films create meaning, and elicit responses within viewers. The ultimate objective of the course is for students to become acquainted with a variety of film forms/styles, while developing the basic skills necessary to analyze and evaluate the cinematic presentations.

FILM 270 Documentary Film
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Documentary Film engages students in a survey of the genre, through an exploration of ethnographic and nature documentaries, wartime propaganda, cinéma vérité and direct cinema, contemporary backstage biographies, mockumentaries and films that spotlight the politics of race, representation, gender and sexuality. Students will practice critical and theoretical approaches to the analysis of cinematic language, production, and ethics.

HIST 100 Making Global History
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 1 p.m.-4:10 p.m. | Summer I
No prerequisite. This course is an introductory and variable topic course considering the importance of the study of past events from various theoretical and methodological perspectives. Through various historical periods, themes, geographic settings and topics, HIST 100 will introduce students to the complex discipline of History beyond the traditional and encourage students to utilize various methodologies and sources to produce and challenge narratives, create agency, and question structures of power in pursuit of a more inclusive and representative world. It longs to suggest that the study of the past includes nuance that can only be found through understanding the confluences of various factors including but not limited to culture, technology, language, politics, economics, religion, law, and events that propel the past into the present and through to the future.

HIST 283 Introduction to Latin American History
3 credits | Online | TTH | Summer IV
No prerequisite. Fulfills a course requirement in the History Core Concentration and for the Latin American and Latino Studies Minor. As an Introduction to Latin American History, this course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the region, peoples, politics, economy and history. Latin America covers a vast region of more than 22 countries who speak a variety of languages. In turn, migration of peoples from the southern hemisphere has helped to shape the character of the United States. Spain was the first colonizer of the whole of the Western Hemisphere from La Florida south. This class will look at the region through a teleological (historical) lens, as well as through topics such as race, gender, and class.

HIST 360 Slavery in the Americas
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session 

HIST 345 Pirates, Sailors, and Whalers in the Atlantic World
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I 
No Prerequisite. Students will explore the history of pirates around the Atlantic World, and consider the myth and reality of piracy. The class will explore a range of primary sources, including execution sermons for pirates and pirate codes from aboard the Jolly Roger.  Students will complete an in-depth case study of the whaling industry in New England. 

HIST 380 Fablehaven: Myth and History in Children's Fantasy 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
What connections are made between myth and children’s stories. Why do authors revamp ancient myths for the modern day with a childlike twist? Where do these ideas come from and what role do they play in the survival of human culture and ways of life from yesteryear? This class will look at the Brandon Mull series Fablehaven as a microcosm for children fantasy and how it influences our views of the past. From the book – “For centuries mystical creatures of all description were gathered into a hidden refuge called Fablehaven to prevent their extinction. The sanctuary survives today as one of the last strongholds of true magic. Enchanting? Absolutely. Exciting? You bet. Safe? Well, actually, quite the opposite.”

HIST 384 The Heirs of Ashur: Assyrian History and Culture 19th-21st Century
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III 

ITAL 350 The Italian-American Experience
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III 
No prerequisite. There exists an enduring disconnect between the ideal Italy that is revered as a great center of art and civilization and the hardship of the emigrant experience. This course will explore the arrival of Italians in the early 20th century, the changing roles of women and the Church, prominent Italian American authors, and the existing stereotypes of Italians in film and television. 

JOURN 430 Community-Driven Solutions
3 credits | Online | MWF, 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. | Summer IV 
This session of JOUR 430 will provide students with hands-on useful and applicable experience in journalistic reporting, editing and publishing, using a community-driven approach based on investigative public affairs reporting into solutions for community priorities and humanistic journalism. Students will learn through a project-based, hands-on, live experience how to assess community’s needs, to acquire information and knowledge, investigate available solutions, interview and collaborate with experts, connect with and learn from community members, and produce and distribute news and digital content for publication to improve the lives of local communities. We will specifically work with the Communities of Hope program in the Mt. Hope neighborhood in Providence and in Bristol County, but the skills are transferable to any other community.

LANG 430 Greek Mythology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I

LATIN 201 Intermediate I
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisites: Successful completion (C- or higher) of Elementary Latin II or equivalent. Fulfills a course requirement in the Language Core Concentration. The first course of a two-course sequence designed as an introduction to Latin literature through intensive reading of major authors of Golden Age prose and poetry, including Cicero and Virgil. Careful attention will be paid to grammar and style.

MUSIC 161 The Art of Rock & Roll
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course explores the history, music, and cultural impact of rock and roll from the 1940s to the present. It involves the student in critical listening and analysis of the fundamental elements of music and technology used in the changing styles of rock and roll.

STCOM Digital and Social Media
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course provides students with an introduction to the history, theory, technology, and uses of social media. Social media (such as Twitter, Facebook, blogging, etc.) are technologies that enable individuals to create, collaborate, and share messages with audiences of all sizes. Students will explore the best practices of social media including the limitations and possibilities and will have hands-on experience with several forms of social media technology. Those who complete this course will know how to use social media productively, and have a framework for understanding and evaluating new tools and platforms. Overall, students will become confident in using social media networks to engage with their prospective and current customers and accomplish their business goals.

STEAM 322 Coding for STEAM
3 credits | Online | MTTH, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. | Summer V
No prerequisite. This course examines the rationale for introducing coding experiences to children and adolescents and provides a foundation in programming skills and curriculum design for coding integration in a variety of settings including classrooms, camps, after-school programs and science centers. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding of the basics of computer coding and computational thinking, as well as the ability to design engaging learning experiences that will inspire and motivate interest in 21st century careers. This course is open to all students.Fulfills a requirement for the STEAM Education Minor and the Education Department STEAM Certificate

STEAM 324 STEAM Field Experience 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III 
No Prerequisite. The purpose of this STEAM Field Experience course is two-fold: (1) for students to explore and work within a STEAM educational site congruent with their desired professional goals for 40 hours throughout the term; and, (2) for students to attend weekly seminars designed to provide deep understanding of research-based best practices in STEAM education. This field experience and companion seminar is intended to be exploratory in nature, which provides experiential learning opportunities as well as reflection. Students learn ways to support STEAM learning through active, engaging, and fun approaches, while engaging in best practices. This course is open to all students.

WTNG 100 Introduction to Academic Writing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Focusing on the connection between reading and writing, this first-year course emphasizes the development of academic arguments. In a series of increasingly complex assignments, students cultivate rhetorical and writing process knowledge as well as an understanding of the general expectations of the academic discourse community. Assignments focus on summary and analysis of academically oriented texts.

WTNG 102 How Writing Works
3 credits | Online | TTH, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | Summer IV
Prerequisite: Placement in WTNG 102 or successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 100.  Fulfills one of the two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor. This first-year course helps students develop a conceptual map of how writing works by building their rhetorical and writing-process knowledge and by fostering genre and discourse community awareness. Students draft a minimum of four revised essays and complete a course portfolio. Students must submit a satisfactory portfolio and earn a C- or higher in the course in order to enroll in a 200- or 300-level WTNG course. 

WTNG 102 How Writing Works
3 credits | Online | Full Session 
Prerequisite: Placement in WTNG 102 or successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 100.  Fulfills one of the two University Core Curriculum requirements in the University Writing Program Fulfills a course requirement in the Professional and Public Writing Core Concentration and Minor. This first-year course helps students develop a conceptual map of how writing works by building their rhetorical and writing-process knowledge and by fostering genre and discourse community awareness. Students draft a minimum of four revised essays and complete a course portfolio. Students must submit a satisfactory portfolio and earn a C- or higher in the course in order to enroll in a 200- or 300-level WTNG course. 

WTNG 220 Critical Writing for the Professions
3 credits | In Person | Full Session
Prerequisites: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102. A research-based course, Critical Writing for the Professions focuses on the guidelines for persuasive writing commonly used in business and industry: how to write for specific audiences, choose the appropriate style, design effective document formats, and use visuals to help achieve a documents purpose. The course emphasizes the composition of such professional documents as letters, proposals, and analytical reports.

WTNG 220 Critical Writing for the Professions
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisites: Successful completion (C- or higher) of WTNG 102. A research-based course, Critical Writing for the Professions focuses on the guidelines for persuasive writing commonly used in business and industry: how to write for specific audiences, choose the appropriate style, design effective document formats, and use visuals to help achieve a documents purpose. The course emphasizes the composition of such professional documents as letters, proposals, and analytical reports.

ACCTG 201 Accounting I: Financial 
3 Credits | Online| TWTHF, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m. | Summer II
No prerequisite. A study of the fundamentals of accounting, with an emphasis on the use of economic data in the decision-making process. Topics covered include: forms of business organizations, financing options, and financial statement analysis. The ability to analyze financial statements is the overall goal of this course. Topics include inventory, property (plant and equipment/natural resources/ intangibles), liabilities, stockholder equity, investments, statement of cash flows.

ACCTG 202 Accounting II: Managerial 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III 
Prerequisite ACCTG 201. Continuation of ACCTG 201, with an emphasis on the application of accounting principles to specific problem areas in managerial accounting as well as accounting for manufacturing operations, and cost-volume-profit analysis.

BUSN 305 Legal Environment of Business I 
3 credits | Online | TWTH, 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer V
Prerequisite junior standing. Examines the major areas of law that concern contemporary business decision-makers. The law is placed in its historical, social and business context. Topics include an introduction to the legal system, contracts, government regulation of business, torts, product liability, employment and consumer law.

ECON 111 Principles of Microeconomics 
3 credits | Online | Summer I
No prerequisite. Students who have completed ECON 102 will not receive credit for ECON 111. An introduction to the modern market economy as a system of dealing with the problem of scarcity and choices made by individuals and businesses. Topics include resource allocation, price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, various market structures, market failure, government intervention and comparative advantage. The basic tools of microeconomic analysis will be applied to topics of current interest such as minimum wage legislation and competition policy.

ECON 112 Principles of Macroeconomics 
3 credits | Online | TWTH, 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer III
No prerequisite  An introduction to the study of the national economy. The measurement, causes, and implications of inflation, unemployment, and recessions are examined, as are the effects of government fiscal and monetary policies. Topics covered include the Keynesian and Classical theories of output and price determination, the Federal Reserve System, and the application of macro theories to events of current interest.

ECON 212 Intermediate Macroeconomics 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
Prerequisite ECON 112 and mathematics at level of MATH 117 or above. Fulfills a course requirement in the economics core concentration. Note: Students who have completed ECON 201 will not receive credit for ECON 212. Provides a deeper analysis of the basic characteristics, institutions, and activities of contemporary market economies. Topics discussed include inflation, unemployment, government monetary and fiscal policy, full employment and economic growth.

ECON 430 Special Topics: Spices, Scimitars, and Galleons 
3 credits | Online | T-F, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m. | Summer I 
No prerequisite  This course studies the Indian Ocean littoral trade during the period 1450-1750. The Indian Ocean littoral during the period was a microcosm of the world and a meeting point of the East and West. Muslim merchants, Hindu bankers, Jewish traders, and Christian adventurers co-existed. Cooperation, despite conflict, determined the economics and culture of the littoral and influenced the flow of the all-important "spice". We will examine this world, which existed before the European hegemony, and the lessons it has for developing stable institutions that achieve common goals in a multicultural world.

LEAD 530 Customer Relations Management
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer III
Customer Relationship Management (CRM) emphasizes using new technology to do business through one-to-one relationships.  We will explore how a customer-focused marketing strategy can be used to harvest the benefits of relationships with the firm’s best customers.  In the process, we will explore the tools used to fine-tune customer acquisition and analyze customer data.

MGMT 340 International Management
3 credits | Online | T-F, 9 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. | Summer I 
This course is developed to create understanding of the international business environment and the issues that could enhance not only the survival, but also the success of an enterprise in the international arena. The primary objectives in this course are to develop knowledge and understanding of the issues related to the international business environment and to provide students with the opportunity to refine this knowledge by analyzing current economic, social-cultural, technological, ethical, and political issues that can influence international companies. This course is designed to promote critical thinking as a manager of an international enterprise through reading and mastering lecture material and exposure to cases, current articles in the business press, and participation in group projects and presentations.

MRKT 340 International Marketing 
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m. - 11:10 a.m. | Summer III
Prerequisite MRKT 200. This course serves as a marketing elective and fulfills the international dimension course requirements for Mario J. Gabelli School of Business students. It examines the global environmental factors and introduces students to the approaches used by global organizations to identify and understand markets and develop successful product, promotion, pricing, and distribution strategies.

MRKT 370 Sports Marketing
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous |Summer I 
Prerequisite MRKT 200   The course covers the essentials of effective sports marketing in the context of the characteristics that make sport unique from other industries; consumer allegiance to sport properties and merchandise, and sponsorship as a dominant form of promotion. The course further covers principles of research, segmentation, product development, pricing and communication channels such as advertising promotions, and of course sponsorship.

MRKT 429 CPC Marketing Studies
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer V
No prerequisite. This course involves a project selected by the Community Partnerships Center and the Business School Dean as a Marketing project. The students will work with a professor and possibly students from other disciplines to fulfill a task requested by a regional company, organization, or governmental unit. Specific project details vary and will be announced prior to preregistration for each semester.

MRKT 430 Digital Marketing 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 

PR 402 Media Relations
3 credits | Online | MTW, 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Summer II 
Pre-Requisite PR.350 or consent of instructor.  The course examines the relationship between organizations and the media. Students intent on becoming public relations practitioners must understand the dynamics and functions of modern media and become adept at managing stories, interacting with reporters, developing media strategies, and building relationships and messages. Students learn the practical application of radio and television interviews, press conferences, corporate media training and crisis communication methods.

PA State & Local Government
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Analysis of state and local governments with emphasis on the distribution of political power and administrative responsibility in selected public programs and areas of public policy.

POLSC 100 American Government and Politics 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
No prerequisite. Fulfills a course requirement in the Political Science Core Concentration. Provides a practical examination of how things get done politically in the United States, including analysis and discussion of American attitudes and institutions. Topics include: the actual making of the U.S. Constitution; the relationship between the national government and the states; civil liberties and civil rights; the role of the President, the Congress and the Supreme Court; elections, interest groups, the media and public opinion; and various contemporary public policy issues. Prerequisite for all advanced courses in the American Politics.

POLSC 120 Comparative Politics 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
No prerequisite. Introduction to the comparative method of studying politics and government outside the United States. Focuses on the democratic political systems of Europe and Japan, but also addresses the rise and decline of the communist political system in Russia, the current efforts at democratic transition in Eastern Europe, and the development of the European Union. Examines the origin and development of formal government institutions, political culture, party systems and electoral behavior, interest group politics, and current issues in comparative perspective. Prerequisite for several courses in the International Relations/Comparative Politics subfield.

POLSC 309 Film and Politics
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full session
No prerequisite. An examination of the way politics is portrayed in film. The course focuses on how politics is conveyed through the symbolism, iconography, and cultural references in film. The content of each film will be discussed in terms of its political and historical context.

CJS 105 Intro to Criminal Justice 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
No prerequisite. An overview of the American criminal justice system. Discusses in detail the individual components of the criminal justice system, including the police, the courts, and corrections. Designed not only to provide basic understanding of our legal system, but also to provoke thinking on key legal and criminal justice issues such as the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws.

CJS 105 Intro to Criminal Justice 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer V
No prerequisite. An overview of the American criminal justice system. Discusses in detail the individual components of the criminal justice system, including the police, the courts, and corrections. Designed not only to provide basic understanding of our legal system, but also to provoke thinking on key legal and criminal justice issues such as the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws.

CJS 150 Policing in America 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
No prerequisite. Review of the history of policing and police functioning, with regard to contemporary social issues. Special focus on related research into police functioning.

CJS 308 Criminology 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
Prerequisite CJS 105. Examines classical and contemporary criminological theories, their historical development and empirical basis, as well as their significance to the criminal justice process and the rehabilitation, deterrence, processing, and punishment of offenders.

CJS 320 Civil & Criminal Procedure in the US Courts
3 credtis | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I
No prerequisite. This course examines the history, traditions, philosophy and ethical dilemmas underlying the courts in the United States justice system. Students will be introduced to: the origins and developments of the United States courts; the issues of subject matter and geographic jurisdiction of the state and federal courts, the dynamics of the courthouse workgroups consisting of attorneys, judges, and litigants; and the processes related to the prosecution of criminal and civil cases in federal and state courts.

CJS 320 Civil & Criminal Procedure in the US Courts
3 credtis | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
No prerequisite. This course examines the history, traditions, philosophy and ethical dilemmas underlying the courts in the United States justice system. Students will be introduced to: the origins and developments of the United States courts; the issues of subject matter and geographic jurisdiction of the state and federal courts, the dynamics of the courthouse workgroups consisting of attorneys, judges, and litigants; and the processes related to the prosecution of criminal and civil cases in federal and state courts.

CJS 430 SpTp: Crime and Film
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II

CJS 430 SpTp: Urban Crime
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II
No prerequisite. This course will examine the phenomena of urban crime.  To accomplish that goal, it will be necessary to examine various urban sociological and deviance theories.  Particular attention will be paid to urban crime events involving drugs, gangs, organized crime, and riots. 

CJS 469 Justice Studies Practicum 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisite Completion of 60 credits and consent of internship coordinator. The Justice Studies Practicum is a combined field experience and academic seminar course, in which the field component is oriented toward the student’s career and professional development while the academic component requires students to relate their conceptual classroom learning to practical application in the field. This course may be taken for a maximum of six credit hours and is open to Criminal Justice and Legal Studies majors.

CJS 503 Survey of Research Methods 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. An introduction to methodology, design and research techniques in the behavioral sciences. Course topics include sampling theory, hypothesis development and theory construction. 

CJS 511 Criminological Theory
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. An intensive overview and analysis of the major criminology theories. Beginning with 18th and 19th century theorists this course focuses primarily on the evolution of sociological constructions of criminality.

CJS 517 Correctional Systems and Practices
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. An examination of contemporary issues in correctional administration. This course presents an analysis of various theories of penology, as well as corrections policy formulation and the administration of corrections agencies., employee drug testing and vicarious liability.

CJS 519 The Juvenile Justice System
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. An examination and analysis of the juvenile justice system. Particular attention is directed to the development of juvenile justice system policy and the treatment of juvenile offenders in the contemporary justice system.

CJS 528 SpTp: Social Media and the CJ System
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. The usage and impact of social media networking sites by and on justice studies institutions and those in positions of public responsibility and trust is multifaceted. For the betterment of the field, this course broadly explores how social media is leveraged within and outside of the three subsystems (policing, courts, corrections)—emphasis is placed on the role this technology plays within the context of the organization/agency and personnel. Internal focus or a reflective lens will examine how social media is used by these subsystems and personnel for image and reputational management, policies and procedures, and personnel utilization of social media. While external focus will investigate the role of social media in two areas; how it is used (a.) on these criminal justice subsystems to ensure accountability, and (b.) in fulfillment of the mission, functions and special operations of the subsystems. 

CJS 528 SpTp: Multicultural Issues in Criminal Justice
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. Faculty and students select specific, contemporary justice system issues for detailed analysis. This course may be retaken to a maximum of six credits hours, provided the topic is different each time.

IDS 210 Effective Speaking Across Audiences 
3 credits | Online | Full Session
This class is designed to give the School of Continuing Studies student experience in the practice of researching, preparing, analyzing, and delivering public and personal presentations most often found in the workplace. One of the primary focuses of this course is to connect the role and practice of public speaking to students’ current or future career goals. The course frames public speaking from a real world, professional approach. The interplay between audience analysis and speaker goals, and the development of personal style is emphasized. Assignments are relevant to adult learners and/or students in the professional world/ workplace. Various types of oral presentations in a variety of settings including interviews, small groups, board meetings, public forums and computer-enhanced speaking opportunities are explored. Students will ultimately gain confidence in their ability to organize and prepare clear, concise and interesting oral presentations to multiple stakeholders needed to meet current and future career goals.

LS 150 Law and Society 
3 credits |Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. Examines the role of the law and our legal system in political, social, and economic life and how the law is used to effect social change. Explores the question: Do societal norms and values shape the law, or does the law shape morality? The course will explore contemporary legal issues and examples of how we encounter the law in everyday life.

LS 430 SpTp: The Juvenile Legal System
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session 
Prerequisite LS 101. A look at the law and policies surrounding the processing and rehabilitation of youth in our criminal justice system.  Particular attention given to recent U.S. Supreme Court opinions on the treatment of juveniles as well as restorative justice policies and other contemporary interventions designed to treat and rehabilitate youthful offenders.  

LS 469 Legal Studies Practicum
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Cross-Listed with: CJS 469. Prerequisites: LS 345 and successful completion of 60+ credits. The Legal Studies Practicum is a combined field experience and academic seminar course in which the field experience is oriented toward the student’s career and professional development, while the academic seminar provides students the opportunity to relate, in written form, their classroom work to application in the field. The LSP 469 Practicum course is required of all legal studies majors as a graduation requirement.  

PLS 100 Intro to Law and Legal Studies 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Introduction to the law and the American legal system. Includes an introduction to legal research, legal writing and analysis, communication skills, law office administration, and legal and professional ethics. Basic concepts of substantive and procedural law, legal terminology, the functions of the courts and the role of attorneys, paralegals and other legal professional, will be stressed.

PLS 101 Criminal Law for the Paralegal
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Note: (Students majoring in Criminal Justice are not permitted to register for this course.) Analysis of substantive criminal law, federal and state, with emphasis on background of the common law. Includes discussion of general principles of criminal law such as the extent to which the law attributes criminality to acts or omissions; criminal intent; conspiracy; infancy; insanity; drunkenness; special defenses; entrapment, mistake, and ignorance; and specific offenses such as offenses against the person, habitation, property, public peace, and morality.

PLS 120 Law in Contemporary Society 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Emphasizes comprehensive understanding of the role of law in today’s world, including an overview of American legal institutions, federal, state, and local; the fundamental distinctions between civil and criminal law, common law and statutory law, substantive and procedural law, trial and appellate courts; quasi-judicial agencies and administrative law, current sources of law, and the U.S. Constitution.

PLS 211 Legal Research and Writing II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisites: PLS 210. Builds upon the basic skills taught in Legal Research & Writing I. Involves students in individualized projects requiring research in multiple sources and use of various writing modes. Explores “non-library research” through government agencies, court personnel, and peer networking; specialized research tools available in particular subject areas in which paralegals are frequently involved; research into legislative history; techniques for searching and updating complex government regulations, both federal and state; and introduction into searching foreign law.

PLS 235 Torts
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Study of the nature of civil wrongs and of jurisprudential concepts concerning liability. Includes the study of injuries to persons, property, and relationships; intentional wrongs; strict liability; negligence; contributory negligence; and causation, deceit, defamation, malicious prosecution, and the impact of insurance on tort liability.

PLS 240 Domestic Relations
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Study of family law, including divorce, separation, procedure, child support and custody, property division, legal rights of the parties, paternity, adoption, intra-family crimes, juvenile delinquency.

PLS 311 Litigation II
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Prerequisites: PLS 310. Building on the principles covered in Litigation I, students develop practical skills in drafting pleadings, discovery, documents, motions, jury instructions, trial notebooks, and post-trial and appeals memoranda. The role of the paralegal in assisting attorneys during settlement, trial or Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) methods is stressed.

SEC 200 Intro to Computer Security Techniques 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. Students should have an existing understanding of computer hardware and software and a desire to learn about networking and cybersecurity. Students require a fully functioning computer such as a Windows PC or a Mac in order to complete the work. This course is an introduction to techniques used in business for managing the security component of information technology. Focus is on the development and maintenance of cyber-security, information assurance, and the security organization. Students will study both strategic and tactical approaches to security development and analysis. The course includes laboratory exercises in penetration testing, network analysis, and other hands-on security techniques.

SEC 201 Intro to Networking
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session 
No prerequisite. Students should have an existing understanding of computer hardware and software and a desire to learn about networking and cybersecurity. Students require a fully functioning computer such as a Windows PC or a Mac in order to complete the work. This course will allow students to develop basic networking skills in TCP/IP related to the N+ certification exam. This course covers fundamental concepts in TCP/IP networking and basic network design using Cisco Packet Tracer. 

SEC 450 Law for Networking, Security and Forensic Professionals 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course specifically focuses on rights, ethics, and policy in accordance primarily with US law in terms of the practice of digital forensics and security. Discussions include areas of law which may specifically apply to forensics or networking/security professionals (e.g. 4th Amendment, Evidence, International law,) and other legal areas which typically have an impact on a digital case. This course may be offered online.

SEC 469 Internship
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. Students in Forensics, Networking & Security and Security Assurance Studies majors are required to complete a 3 credit internship in their area of study. Students should register for SEC 469 once they have arranged their internship with the employer. This course requires approval of the internship coordinator. Grading is Pass/Fail.

SEC 500 Intro to Cybersecurity 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
No prerequisite. This course will introduce new students to cybersecurity terminology, concepts, procedures, and issues. Students will be introduced to both a professional security certification and subject matter covered in greater depth in subsequent courses. Additionally students will be exposed to researching and assessing cyber threats as they pertain to three major avenues of employment in the cybersecurity field: government, business, and law enforcement.

PSYCH 100  Introduction to Psychology 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
Requirement Fulfillment: Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. Introduction to the basic conceptual approaches through which psychology derives its intellectual form. Emphasis is placed upon the nature of scientific inquiry and its role in obtaining an understanding of human behavior. Exposure to various psychological theories, including Freudianism, behaviorism, social learning, and humanism.

PSYCH 206 Psychology of Loss
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
Prerequisite PSYCH 100. Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. Presents the theory and research related to loss. Readings and discussions focus on death, dying, the grieving process and social support, loss and intimate relationships, and growth through loss. In addition, through the completion of a group presentation and research paper, students examine other types of loss such as loss of memory, loss of friendships, loss of dreams or loss of health.

PSYCH 214 Group Dynamics
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
Prerequisite: PSYCH 100. Requirement Fulfillment: Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. Examines theory and research associated with the utilization of group designs in treatment settings, business organizations, and other large institutions. Surveys a variety of designs through discussion and reading assignments.

PSYCH 313 Psychology of Infancy
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I 
Prerequisites PSYCH 100. Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. Does infancy matter?  We don’t even remember our infancy … can such a brief period in our lives have a significant impact?  We will be exploring that question and more in this course, providing an in-depth view of the study of infancy from prenatal development through the toddler years.  The study of infancy is, by its nature, interdisciplinary – we will draw from the fields of psychology, pediatrics, anthropology, sociology, and public health. Special attention will be given to issues that impact society and social policy and address the important question: how can we give infants the healthiest and happiest start to their lives?

PSYCH 314 Psychology of Adulthood 
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m. | Summer I 
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. Prerequisite: PSYCH 100 or consent of instructor. Considers basic perspectives on adult development. Using the concept of continuing maturation throughout the lifespan, it focuses on the latter portion of human life. Discussions center on changes in intelligence, motivation, learning, and memory which are supposed to accompany aging, as well as the psychology of dying and bereavement, and the psychosocial aspects of growing old. Field work in a retirement center.

PSYCH 326 Health Psychology
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous |Full Session 
Prerequisite PSYCH 100. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of health psychology. Health psychology is a discipline that examines the causes and correlates of health, chronic conditions, and illness and dysfunction across individuals and populations. This field further studies the interplay between physiology, emotions, cognition, and behavioral factors that can affect the prevention, onset, duration, management, and recovery of chronic conditions and illnesses. We will focus on the promotion and maintenance of health (e.g., the effect of psychological factors on health-promoting and health compromising behaviors), the development of illness (e.g., the effect of psychological factors on the development and progression of disease), and the treatment of illness (e.g., the effect of psychological factors on the management of illness). The biopsychoocial model will be used as an organizing template to discuss these questions. We will also discuss individual differences (culture, ethnicity, lifestyle, religion, gender, etc.) and their effect on health, chronic conditions, and illnesses. Within this course, select chronic conditions (e.g., cancer, heart disease, stroke, AIDS) will be reviewed in more depth within the biopsychosocial framework.

PSYCH 327 Psychology of Food and Eating 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
No perequisite. This course explores the psychological processes, theories, and research that surround humanity's complex relationship with food. We will focus on food consumption, advertising, and production from a psychological perspective and discuss how food choices impact our identity and health. We will also discuss different forms of eating-related psychopathology such as eating disorders and binging/purging behavior and review evidence-based treatments for these behaviors. Lastly, we will identify the ways that culture and class-based food choice and availability impact individual and societal health.

PSYCH 360 Multicultural Psychology 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
Prerequisite: PSYCH 100 and junior standing or consent of instructor Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration This course examines multicultural issues within psychology, focusing on racial, cultural, and ethnic characteristics and identities, as well as other domains of difference, such as gender, age, sexual orientation, religion, ability, and their intersections. The course seeks to define multiculturalism and its role within psychological research and theory, exploring such topics as prejudice and stereotyping, communication styles, cultural values and identities, immigration and acculturation, and mental and physical health among diverse cultural groups.

PSYCH 390 Substance Abuse
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I 
Fulfills a course requirement in the Psychology Core Concentration. No prerequisite. The course provides a comprehensive review of psychoactive substances. Major classes of drugs are covered in class, including their history, modes of intake, effects, and consequences of use. Distinctions are made between substance use, misuse, abuse, and dependence. Types of education, prevention measures, and treatment approaches are also presented.

PSYCH 430 The Psychology of HIV and Sexual Health
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I 

 

CHEM 191 Principles of Chemistry I
4 credits | In Person | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | Summer II
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 191L. Concurrent enrollment in, or completion of, MATH 136 or higher. Primarily intended for science majors. Examines the development of such concepts as the structure of matter, the chemical bond, the gas laws, and solutions. Laboratory is an integral part of the course.

CHEM 191L.51 Principles of Chemistry I Lab
0 credits | In Person | Summer II
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 191.

CHEM 191L.52 Principles of Chemistry I Lab
0 credits | In Person | Summer II
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 191.

CHEM 192 Principles of Chemistry II
4 credits | In Person | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | Summer V
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 192L. Prerequisite: Successful completion ( C- or higher) of CHEM 191Continuation of Chemistry 191, intended primarily for science majors. Emphasizes thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium concepts, electrochemistry, and some organic chemistry. Laboratory is an integral part of the course.

CHEM 192 Principles of Chemistry II
3 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | Summer II
Section dedicated to Spr 2021 CHEM 192 students. Prerequisite: Successful completion ( C- or higher) of CHEM 191 Continuation of Chemistry 191, intended primarily for science majors. Emphasizes thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium concepts, electrochemistry, and some organic chemistry. 

CHEM 192L.51 Principles of Chemistry II Lab
0 credits | In Person | Summer V
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 192.

CHEM 192L.52 Principles of Chemistry II Lab
0 credits | In Person | Summer V
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 192.

CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry
4 credits | In Person | TWF, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. | Summer III
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 301L. Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM 192 (C- or higher). Examines the theory and basic principles of the common organic functional groups. Topics include: hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, aromatic compounds, and stereochemistry. Laboratory emphasizes organic qualitative analysis.

CHEM 301L Organic Chemistry Lab
0 credits | In Person | Summer III
Must be taken in conjunction with CHEM 301.

CNST 475 Construction Project Control
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer II 
Prerequisites: CNST 321, CNST 450. An examination of the activities involved in the effective management of single and multiple construction projects. The course includes the study of basic control theory, the preparation of control models, the collection of actual production data, the computation of project performance, and the determination of appropriate corrective action.

COMSC 110 Introduction to Computer Science I
4 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-12:10 p.m. | Summer I 
No prerequisite A broad-based introduction to the core concepts of computer science with an emphasis on program design. Topics include basic algorithms and data structures, recursion, event-handling, and object-oriented concepts. The course employs the Java programming language to develop interactive applets designed to run within the students World Wide Web home page.

COMSC 110L Introduction to Computer Science I Lab
0 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer I

EMS 212 EMT Paramedic II
6 credits | In Person | Full Session
Note: This course is part two of the four part sequence required for students to sit for the National Paramedic Certification Exam.
This Program consists of over 172 hours of classroom lecture/didactic and the start of 50 hours of clinical setting training and demonstration of skill. In addition a significant time is spent riding on an approved 911 rescue. It also requires several hours of hospital internship. This Paramedic course helps prepare students for certification as a Paramedic.

HCA 413 Moral/Ethical Issues in Health Care
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Introduces students, currently employed (or intending to be employed) in the health care field, to the moral/ethical issues and dilemmas facing the healthcare industry/employee(s) today and into the future. A sampling of selected topics that will be discussed and researched include: informed consent, euthanasia, rationing of health care services, advance directives, biomedical research, heroic measures, the uninsured and underinsured.

MATH 110 Mathematics in the Modern World
3 credits | Online | Full Session 
Requirement Fulfillment: Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Survey of mathematics designed for students who are majoring in non-technical areas. Topics may include problem-solving techniques, an introduction to statistical methods, and an introduction to the mathematics of finance.

MATH 124 Basic Statistics 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session 
Requirement Fulfillment: Fulfills the University Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics. Emphasizes descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation.

NATSC Special Topics in Environmental Science
1 credit | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
Advanced-level topics of importance in environmental science, determined by interest of the students in consultation with faculty. This course may be repeated for credit, but students may not study the same subject more than once.

PHYS 109 Physics I Algebra Based and Lab
4 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-11:10 a.m. |Summer V
Must be taken in conjunction with PHYS 109L. Co-listed with: PHYS 201. Prerequisites: MATH 136 or higher. An introduction to physics without calculus. Vectors, equilibrium of particles, rectilinear motion, Newton’s second law, motion in a plane, work and energy, impulse and momentum, torque, rotational motion, elasticity, periodic motion, fluids, heat and thermodynamics.

PHYS 109L Physics I Algebra Lab
0 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Summer V
Must be taken in conjunction with PHYS 109.

PHYS 202 Physics II with Calculus and Lab
4 credits | Online | TWTHF, 9 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | Summer II
Must be taken in conjunction with PHYS 202L. Prerequisites: PHYS 201. Pre- or Co-requisite: MATH 214. Requirement Fulfillment: PHYS 201 and PHYS 202 may be used to fulfill the Core Curriculum requirement in laboratory science. Covers vibrations and waves, electricity and magnetism, optics, the atomic nucleus and radioactivity.

PHYS 202L Physics II Calculus Lab
0 credits | Online | TWTH, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. | Summer II
Must be taken in conjunction with PHYS 202.

PHYS 240 Introductory Astronomy with Lab
4 credits | Online | TWTH, 9 a.m.-11:10 a.m. | Summer II 
No prerequisite. Course may be used for CORE 101 requirement. Intended for both the science major and anyone interested in learning more about the nature of the physical universe. Topics covered include the Earth, solar system, star formation and evolution, extrasolar planets, galaxies, and cosmology. The lab will include observations of the sky and celestial objects.

PHYS 240L Introductory Astronomy Lab
0 credits | Online | Summer II
Must be taken in conjunction with PHYS 240.

PPSS Intro to Emergency Medical Services 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course will provide students with an understanding of the evolution of emergency medical services in the United States and the role of EMS in public safety. Specific topics will include different the effects of social and societal issues on the EMS mission, public health policy, and the future of emergency medical services.

PPSS 200 Intro to Public Safety Technology 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course will provide students an understanding of the use and deployment of technology in public safety. This will include the basic strengths and weaknesses of radio, telecommunications, and computer network structures, legal issues related to emerging technologies, like drones, body worn cameras and GPS tracking devices, public safety dispatch, records management, and mobile reporting systems, and Automated Electronic Defibrillator technology. 

PPSS 450 Public Safety Capstone
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course synthesizes public safety concepts and perspectives covered in the core PPSS courses. Students will analyze real-world examples of the application of principles covered in these courses. Students will also explore current theoretical approaches and trends within the field of public safety. 

SHS 100 Foundations of Social and Health Services 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
 

Interested in taking one of these graduate courses this summer? To be eligible to take a non-matriculating course or to be considered for admission to a master’s degree or certificate program, you must possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. Non-matriculating students will need to submit the graduate application at grad.rwu.edu/apply and submit a copy of their transcript showing a bachelor’s degree conferred to the Office of Graduate Admission. Transcripts may be emailed to gradadmit@rwu.edu or mailed to the Office of Graduate Admission, Roger Williams University, 1 Old Ferry Rd., Bristol, RI 02809. Permission to take a non-matriculating course or admission to a degree or certificate program is subject to approval by the faculty program director of the intended program or course. Questions? Call the Office of Graduate Admission at 401-254-6200 or email gradadmit@rwu.edu.

CD 522 Fundamentals of Urban Ecology and Healthy Communities
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session
This course examines components and relationships within urban ecosystems. From both a historic and contemporary vantage point, students will explore the different stakeholders that make up the urban neighborhood environment, the relationships among and between them and how community and economic development initiatives can positively impact the health of a community.

CJS 545 Law for Forensics Professionals 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Full Session | Graduate Level
This course specifically focuses on the rights, ethics, and policy in accordance with both US and International law in terms of the practice of digital forensics. Discussions include areas of law which may specifically apply to forensic professionals (e.g. 4th Amendment), ethics, and other areas which typically emerge having an impact on a digital case.

EDU 612 Collaboration, Co-Teaching, & Consultation
3 credits | Online | TWTH, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. | Summer II | Graduate Level
No prerequisite. Virtually every classroom in the United States contains at least one child with a disability, a fact that presents both challenges, and great promise for general education classroom teachers and children alike. The primary emphasis of this course is on how to plan, manage, and evaluate learning effectively in diverse classroom settings, as special educators are increasingly asked to design, consult, and collaborate with general education classroom teachers who must often educate students with disabilities in inclusive settings. To this end, we will review research-based instructional practices appropriate for students with disabilities who are included in general education classroom environments.

EDU 613 Cultivating Pro Social Behavior
3 credits | Online | MWTH, 6pm-9pm | Summer III | Graduate Level
No prerequisite. In this course, students will examine current theories of social-emotional development as well as the most prevalent disorders of emotional control and behavioral self-regulation. Our primary focus, however, will be on research-supported strategies for facilitating the development of pro-social behavior in children who struggle with low self-concept, behavioral inhibition, social isolation, and/or reciprocal social interaction.

SEC 600 Cybersecurity Essentials I 
3 credits | Online | Asynchronous | Graduate Level 
This is a basic course in Cybersecurity to introduce new students to the concepts involved in technology ranging from physical security of technology assets to secure programming and networking concepts. Audit and assurance are also components of this type of course. The course introduces terms as well as best practice guidelines in the Cybersecurity arena. Students holding existing degrees in technology, security, or closely related areas, or a CISSP, may substitute any SEC elective.   

Register

Current RWU Students

You can register for Summer Sessions online through Roger Central, as you would for any other semester. If you have any questions, reach out to your advisor. They are happy to review and discuss potential summer courses with you. 

Roger Central

New RWU Students (Entering Class, Fall 2021)

To learn more about summer offerings, and express interest, please contact Elizabeth Niemeyer, Director of Advising and Peer Mentorship, at eniemeyer@rwu.edu.

Visiting Undergraduate or Pre-College High School Students 

Welcome! If you are not currently enrolled as a student at RWU, register through our University College registration process.

You don't need to fully apply to take a course as a visiting student, but we do need a little bit of information to get you registered.

Fill out our visiting student enrollment form and put the course number/key from above in the appropriate field. If you're not sure which course would be best, just fill in a subject and our admission team can find a course that fits your needs.

Once we have processed your course registration, you will receive an email with your ID number and RWU email. You'll need this to access your course in Bridges, our learning management system.

Undergraduate Visiting Student Registration