Alcohol and Drug Policy

Alcohol and Drug-Free School and Workplace Policy 

Roger Williams University, including Roger Williams University School of Law (the “University”), established this Alcohol and Drug-Free School and Workplace Policy (the “Policy”) in response to and in conformity with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S.C. § 701) and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (20 U.S.C. § 1011i). Students and employees of the University shall receive a copy of this Policy on an annual basis.

Roger Williams University is committed to cultivating an environment that is safe and helpful for all of its members by providing education and resources that promote healthy lifestyles and responsible decision making. The misuse of alcohol and other drugs may negatively affect students’ academic potential and their well-being as well as that of the university community. A caring, safe, and well-informed community fosters an environment where all members can learn and thrive. To this end, the Alcohol and Other Drug Task Force under the Student Life Division was created to regularly review campus climate, policies, and prevention programs that uphold this commitment.

Health Risks 

Drinking alcohol has immediate effects that can increase the risks of many harmful health conditions. Excessive alcohol use can lead to increased risk of health problems such as liver disease or unintentional injuries. The use of illegal drugs also carries many serious health risks. Illegal drugs may be addictive and may lead to long-term damage to the body. Heavy or long-term use of some illegal drugs may cause the user to overdose, which may cause permanent damage to the body and can be fatal.

Students and employees who may have a problem with the use of illegal drugs or the abuse of alcohol should be aware of resources at the University and the surrounding community that offer services to students and employees. The University resources listed may not be available to all students and employees.

Education: Alcohol and Your Body 

Alcohol is a drug. It is a depressant that is absorbed into the bloodstream and transmitted to virtually all parts of the body. An evening of heavy drinking has impact the following day. Alcohol leaves the system at a rate of .015 percent per hour (a little less than a standard drink per hour). Drinking coffee, taking showers and other activities have no effect on the speed with which you “sober up”.

Even moderate doses of alcohol reduce physical coordination and mental alertness, making certain activities such as sports or driving dangerous. Larger doses of alcohol cause staggering, slurred speech, double vision, sudden mood swings, and unconsciousness. In addition, long-term heavy drinking and frequent binge drinking may result in consistent negative consequences resulting from alcohol use. Long-term heavy drinkers increase their risk of developing liver and heart disease, circulatory problems, peptic ulcers, various forms of cancer, and irreversible brain damage.

Drinking games and pre-gaming (i.e., drinking large quantities or rapid ingestion of alcohol in a short period of time before attending an event) are particularly dangerous. When blood alcohol level rises rapidly a blackout may occur. A blackout is when someone is conscious yet has no memory of what they are doing. Also, one’s ability to recognize their level of intoxication is impaired and with continued drinking alcohol poisoning can result. There are some things that can be done to reduce the negative consequences from alcohol use:

  • Pacing drinks
  • Knowing & setting personal limits
  • Using the buddy system for a night when drinking will occur
  • Eating before & while drinking
  • Alternating drinks with a glass of water
  • Measuring drinks
  • Knowing about Blood Alcohol Content
  • Arranging transportation ahead of time
  • Intervening with a friend to prevent injury
  • Choosing a drink containing lower alcohol content
  • Knowing the signs of alcohol poisoning

If Your Friend is Intoxicated: 

  • Get your friend to a safe place.
  • Do not leave your friend alone; monitor breathing.
  • Turn your friend on his/her side to prevent choking.
  • Check for signs of alcohol poisoning.

What to do for Alcohol Poisoning 

Symptoms:

  • Person is unconscious or semi-conscious.
  • Person has cold, clammy, pale or bluish skin color.
  • Person has slow or irregular breaths (Less than 8 times a minute, or more than 10 seconds in between breaths).
  • Person is vomiting and does not wake up.

This is a Medical Emergency! Call for Help Immediately!

  • On Campus: call Public Safety at 401-254-3333.
  • Off Campus: call 911.

Dial 9-1-1 Immediately if Someone:

  • Stops Breathing
  • Collapses
  • Has a seizure

Call your local poison center at 1-800-222-1222. These experts can help you decide whether someone can be treated at home, or whether he or she must go to a hospital.

Standards of Conduct 

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance, illicit drug, or alcohol by any person, including visitors and vendors, is prohibited in or on the University premises, in vehicles owned, leased, or rented by the University, at any work site or location at which University duties are being performed by University employees or students, as part of any University activity, or at off-campus activities of student groups recognized by the University. Additional standards of conduct for students and employees are noted in this document.

Condition of Employment 

As a condition of employment, all employees must (i) agree to abide by this Policy, and (ii) notify the University of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace no later than five (5) days after such conviction. Notices should be sent to the Assistant Vice President of Human Resources.

Requirements for Students Receiving Federal Grants 

Students who receive Pell and certain other federal grants must report any conviction of a drug-related offense to the United States Department of Education within ten (10) days of the conviction if the offense occurred during the period covered by the grant.

Biennial Review 

The University shall conduct a biennial review of this Policy by December 31st of each even-numbered calendar year to (i) determine the Policy’s effectiveness and implement any needed changes to the Policy, and (ii) ensure that the sanctions required by the Policy are consistently enforced.

Alcoholic Beverages Policy 

Purpose and Applicability

This policy governs the service and/or consumption of alcoholic beverages at Roger Williams University, including Roger Williams University School of Law (“University”), and applies to events on the University’s Bristol, Portsmouth (Baypoint), and Providence (One Empire Street) campuses and off-campus University-sponsored events. For purposes of this policy, an off-campus University-sponsored event is an event occurring at any off-campus location where alcoholic beverages are served and/or consumed and the event is hosted and/or paid for in whole or in part by the University, including but not limited to any school, department, office, group, club, or team of the University.

Examples of events that are governed by this policy include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • University-sponsored conferences, dinners, events, meetings, and receptions;
  • Department, faculty, or staff meetings and receptions, including those occurring after business hours; and
  • Third party conferences, events, meetings, and receptions.

This policy does not apply to the following:

  • The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages by University students or their guests which does not occur at a University-sponsored event (governed by the Student Handbook and noted in this document);
  • The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages by Coordinators of Residential Education (“CORE”) or their guests over the age of 21 in CORE apartments (governed by the CORE Staff Manual);
  • The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages by University employees who reside in University apartments or their guests over the age of 21 in their assigned University apartments; or
  • The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages at the University Residence by the President, his family, or his personal guests, or to events at the University Residence of ten or fewer persons.

Written approval Required:

Written approval is required for each event at which alcoholic beverages will be served and/or consumed at the University, as well as for off-campus, University-sponsored events as noted below. The organizer of the event must use the Alcoholic Beverages Policy Approval Form to obtain such approval, available at http://rwu.edu/sites/default/files/alcohol-policy-form-rwu.pdf. Each form should be accompanied by a proposal explaining logistics of event and reason alcohol is essential.

TYPE OF EVENTNECESSARY APPROVAL(S)*
School of Law Events occurring within the SOL building, on the Providence campus, or off-campusEVP for Finance and Administration; and Dean of the School of Law
  
School of Law Events other than those captured above (i.e., occurring on the Bristol campus but not within the SOL building or on the Portsmouth campus)EVP for Finance and Administration; Vice President for Student Life; and Dean of the School of Law
  
University Student Events on the Bristol campus within a building or off-campusVice President for Student Life
  
University Student Events other than those captured above (i.e., occurring on the Bristol campus but not within a building or on the Portsmouth or Providence campuses)EVP for Finance and Administration; and Vice President for Student Life
  
All Other Events on the Bristol or Portsmouth campusesEVP for Finance and Administration; and Vice President for Student Life
  
All Other Off-Campus University-Sponsored Events or Events on the Providence campusEVP for Finance and Administration

* Or the specifically appointed management designee in the event of an extended absence of the approving authority.

Use of Approved caterers and certified alcohol servers

The service of alcoholic beverages at the University must be arranged through Bon Appétit Management Company, the University’s approved caterer, or an approved third party caterer. Third party caterers must hold a valid Rhode Island Class P liquor license, comply with the University’s liability insurance requirements, and receive the prior written approval of the Office of General Counsel through a written agreement signed by the third-party caterer and the University. Additionally, all alcoholic beverages must be served by a person holding a valid certificate of completion from an alcohol server training program approved by the Rhode Island Department of Business Regulation.

Sale of Alcoholic Beverages (Cash Bars)

Bon Appétit Management Company: Bon Appétit Management Company, on behalf of the University, must obtain a Class F (beer and wine only) or Class F1 (beer, wine, and spirits) liquor license to sell alcoholic beverages on the Bristol or Providence campuses. Class F and Class F1 liquor licenses may be obtained through the Town of Bristol or the City of Providence. A Class F or Class F1 liquor license is not required for Bon Appétit Management Company to sell alcoholic beverages on the Portsmouth campus, as the University maintains a Class B-H, Class B-T, and Class B-V liquor license with the Town of Portsmouth.

Third Party Caterers: Approved third party caterers must hold a valid Rhode Island Class P liquor license to sell alcoholic beverages on the Bristol, Portsmouth, or Providence campuses. Third party caterers are not eligible to obtain Class F or Class F1 liquor licenses.

Regulations

In addition to the regulations below, the service of alcoholic beverages at the University must comply with state and local laws and regulations.

  • Alcoholic beverages may not be served to or consumed by persons under the age of 21. Proper identification of age must be produced to a certified alcohol server upon service of the alcoholic beverage.
  • Under no circumstances may alcoholic beverages be served to visibly intoxicated persons.
  • Any event offering alcoholic beverages must also offer a comparable quantity of food and non- alcoholic beverages.
  • Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed outside the confines of the event.
  • Self-service bars are prohibited; all alcoholic beverages must be served by a certified alcohol server.
  • Alcoholic beverages served at undergraduate student events shall be limited to beer and wine with limited exceptions only authorized by agreement of all designated approvers.
  • Organizers of student events are required to mandate that students over the age of 21 wear University-approved wrist bracelets before they are served alcoholic beverages. Alcohol events must have a public safety/security presence at the event unless otherwise waived by Vice President for Student Life.

Off-campus University-sponsored events

Off-campus University-sponsored events must comply with the following provisions:

  • If the event will be held at a facility that is properly licensed to serve alcoholic beverages, all alcoholic beverages must be served by that facility.
  • If the event will be held at a facility that is not properly licensed to serve alcoholic beverages, all alcoholic beverages must be served by a caterer that is properly licensed to serve alcoholic beverages or Bon Appétit Management Company. The caterer must receive the prior written approval of the Office of General Counsel through a written agreement signed by the caterer and the University. Additionally, a copy of the caterer’s license to serve alcoholic beverages must be provided to the Office of General Counsel prior to the event.
  • If the event will be held at a personal residence, please contact the Office of General Counsel prior to the event to discuss licensing and liability issues.

Serving alcohol at student events

In addition to the regulations contained in the Alcoholic Beverages Policy, the following additional regulations apply to student events, which are events that are primarily geared toward students:

  • Alcohol may be served to students at co-curricular student events only when under the supervision of the Director of Student Programs & Leadership, or designee.
  • The Director of Student Programs & Leadership, or designee, will ensure that all alcoholic beverages are served by a non-Roger Williams University student holding a valid certificate of completion from an alcohol server training program approved by the Rhode Island Department of Business Regulation.
  • The Director of Student Programs & Leadership, or designee, will hire an appropriate number of police officer(s) and/or public safety officer(s) to provide security for the event.
  • Police officers/public safety officers will arrive prior to the start of the serving of alcohol and will not leave until the serving of alcohol has stopped.
  • The University will not permit drinking contests at these events or in the promotion of these events.
  • Non-alcoholic beverages must be mentioned in the advertising. Alcohol shall not be used as an inducement to participate in any event or in the advertising for any event.

Alcohol policy at athletic events

Alcohol consumption will not be permitted at athletic events and will be applied equally to students, faculty, staff and alumni. Police officers may be employed to stop spectators from drinking at outside events. The athletic staff will be responsible for preventing drinking at indoor events. The coaches will be responsible for ensuring student athletes do not drink on team buses or at group meals on road trips.

Marketing

For guidelines concerning marketing, advertising and promotion of alcoholic beverages on campus, refer to the University Advertising Policy (see: Advertising Policy.)

Student Conduct Code – Alcohol Policies

Students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol in specified quantities, in designated university housing rooms in a manner that does not lead to incapacitation or abuse. Students who are of legal drinking age may not share or provide alcohol to any persons who are under 21 years of age. Those under 21 years of age are not permitted to possess or consume alcohol anywhere on university property or at university-sponsored events.

Behavior that violates the student code of conduct includes, but is not limited to:

  1. Possession or use of alcohol under the legal drinking age;
  2. Sale, manufacture or distribution of alcohol;
  3. Possession of alcohol that exceeds quantity limits. For students who are of legal age, the quantity limit per student is: 15 beers OR 1.5 liters of wine OR 1 pint of hard alcohol (no higher than 80 proof and not stimulant-enhanced), but not to exceed 60 beers OR 3.0 liters of wine OR 1 liter (2 pints) of hard alcohol, regardless of the number of occupants. Empty containers will be counted towards the quantity limits. Possession of kegs or other large alcohol storage devices (i.e., trash cans, beer balls) are prohibited;
  4. Presence at a gathering with underage drinking or that exceeds quantity limits;
  5. Possession or use of drinking paraphernalia typically used or associated with excessive drinking (such as drinking funnels, beer bongs, beer pong tables, or taps);
  6. Operation of a motor vehicle, motorcycle or other motorized form of transportation under the influence of alcohol;
  7. Abuse (requiring medical attention, passing out, vomiting, loss of memory or hospitalization) or high-risk drinking activities, such as drinking large quantities of alcohol, consuming alcohol at an accelerated pace (chugging), use of alcohol with medication or other controlled substances, participation (present or active) in drinking games, and/or any activity that promotes irresponsible drinking;
  8. Use of alcohol containers, packaging or signage for decoration;
  9. Possession or use of alcohol, regardless of age, outside approved residence hall rooms or in alcohol-free spaces on campus including, but not limited to, designated residence halls (i.e., South Campus: Maple, Cedar, Willow, Stonewall, Baypoint) and academic buildings without prior approval and following the University procedures for serving alcohol; and
  10. Violations of other University alcohol policies or federal, state, and local laws pertaining to alcohol.

Students hosting social gatherings

Any social gathering or party, which draws attention to itself in a negative manner within University Housing, will not be permitted. Parties will be identified by University officials based on a variety of factors including but not limited to:

  • Number of guests. The University guideline is: maximum number of people allowed in a room equals the number of residents x5, not to exceed 25.
  • Excessive quantities of alcohol and/or alcohol empty containers.
  • Games that promote the rapid consumption of alcohol (such as beer pong) are prohibited.
  • Disturbing the peace, noise, and/or people immediately outside the room/apartment.
  • Uncooperative residents and/or guests.

Each student who lives in off-campus housing is expected to behave as a responsible citizen of that local community. Sponsoring and/or attending a party which is disruptive to the community or where laws are broken (e.g., serving minors, selling of alcohol without a license, etc.) can subject the student to University conduct action.

Stimulant-Enhanced Beverage Policy

Roger Williams University prohibits the possession and/or use of stimulant-enhanced alcoholic beverages, including but not limited to the brands Four Loko and Joose. This also includes products that combine beer or malt liquor with caffeine, guarana, taurine or other similar substances found in energy drinks, and drinks that have increased alcohol percentage by volume, as these beverages pose a serious health risk to our students and the community.

Drinking alcohol in combination with energy drinks has been recognized as risky, given the inherent danger in mixing alcohol, a depressant, with stimulants such as caffeine, ginseng, guarana, and other additives. This combination can result in a phenomenon known as “wide awake drunk,” where intoxicated people mistakenly conclude they can perform potentially dangerous functions.

This ban is consistent with RWU policy that prohibits alcohol products that increase the rate of alcohol consumption such as grain alcohol and handles of hard alcohol. In addition, violations of this ban may have increased sanctions similar to violations of policies involving hard alcohol quantity and common source.

Student Conduct Code - Drug Regulations

Behavior that violate the drug policy includes, but is not limited to:

  • Possession of drug paraphernalia (such as bongs, scales, pipes, etc.)
  • The actual or intended purchase, possession or use of illegal drugs, narcotics, controlled substances or prescription drugs without a prescription
  • The actual or intended sale, distribution, cultivation or manufacture of illegal drugs, narcotics, controlled substances or prescription drugs
  • Presence at a gathering with illegal drugs, controlled substances or drug use
  • Operation of a motor vehicle under the influence or impaired
  • Violations of other University drug policies or federal, state, and local laws pertaining to illegal drugs and controlled substances

Statement on Marijuana 

The use of marijuana can negatively impact learning, impair clear thinking and mental alertness, and conflicts with the educational mission of Roger Williams University. As an educational institution that receives federal funds, Roger Williams University must comply with federal law under the Drug- Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (20 U.S.C. Section 1011i). Accordingly, the use, possession, distribution, sale or cultivation of marijuana remains prohibited for all students on and off campus via the RWU Student Handbook and the Student Code of Conduct. However, students who possess a lawfully issued medical marijuana card and use marijuana for that purpose in private, off-campus residences will be exempt from University policy in that regard.

Medical Marijuana

The Rhode Island Medical Cannabis Law and program allows Rhode Islanders who are registered users to use medical marijuana to treat certain conditions. However, the possession and use of marijuana remains illegal under the federal law to which the college is subject, including the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, the Controlled Substances Act, and the Campus Security Act. Therefore, the use, possession, production, manufacture, and distribution of marijuana - medical or otherwise - continues to be prohibited while a student is on university owned or controlled property or at any function authorized or controlled by the university. Questions concerning medical marijuana should be directed to Dr. Lisa Landreman, Dean of Student Life, at llandreman@rwu.edu.

University Smoking Policy 

Roger Williams University takes pride in providing an atmosphere where students, employees and guests can breathe easy. In addition to outstanding academic programs, a beautiful scenic bayside campus and pleasant environment for study and work, the University continues to enhance a healthful environment for all in the University community. The University is committed to providing wellness opportunities for all students, faculty and staff. Whether it is cardiovascular, emotional or respiratory fitness, the total health of each student and employee is important to Roger Williams University. Part of the emphasis on wellness includes a clean, healthy respiratory environment for all in the University community. To ensure a healthier atmosphere for everyone on campus, and following input and recommendation from a special University committee comprised of representatives from faculty, staff and students, the University adopts the following policy:

Policy Statement

In compliance with the State of Rhode Island’s Smoking Law, and except as specifically provided for herein, smoking of any materials is prohibited on University premises, including all residence halls, offices and University vehicles. As a reasonable accommodation to individuals desiring to smoke, the University has established designated, outside smoking areas as the exclusive venue for smoking while on University premises. These areas were designated to remove the reasonable likelihood of second hand smoke migrating back into a building, as this is a requirement of the law. The use of electronic cigarettes is permitted solely in these designated areas. However, hookahs, water pipes, bongs, and drug paraphernalia are prohibited on all campus property, as well as the use and possession of marijuana.

Implementation

In accordance with Rhode Island Law, smoking is prohibited outside of any doorway or area where smoke could migrate back into a building. Accordingly, signs have been placed at the entrance to buildings informing individuals that smoking is prohibited in the building and the entryway. Smoking at and only at designated areas is allowed. All smoking material must be extinguished and disposed of within the designated area at a receptacle provided.

Information and compliance

It is the responsibility of every member of the University community to observe and uphold this policy, informing visitors of its existence and parameters, and except as set out immediately below, directing questions, concerns and reports of violations, to the Department of Public Safety’s Division of Environmental Health and Safety (401-254-3189). Concerns by or involving all students (other than students of the law school) should be directed to the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution. Students who are found smoking in the residence halls are subject to conduct action.

Incoming students and new personnel shall be informed of the smoking policy during orientation. A map of the University, marking the designated smoking areas will be made available to those who request it through the Department of Public Safety’s Division of Environmental Health and Safety. To request a map, please call Public Safety at 401-254-3611.

Important Highlights

  1. No Smoking on Campus – except in 16 designated smoking areas (inside gazebos) identified on the campus map.
  2. No Smoking in University parking lots with the exception of Lot A (including the parking deck) Lot 7 (Upper) and Lot H (Lower) Old Ferry Road.
  3. Gazebo smoking shelters are available across campus and are marked as smoking areas, with appropriate seating and cigarette receptacles.
  4. Elimination of cigarette receptacles within the core of the campus.
  5. Low-cost access to the patch through the health services department for students.
  6. Access to improved educational programs and support resources for students through health services.
  7. Community enforcement of the policy: Cooperation with and enforcement of the University’s Smoking Policy is the responsibility of all community members with special emphasis on those with supervision responsibility. Violations of the policy by students will be treated as a violation of the student Code of Conduct and will be documented and sanctioned appropriately.

Violations of the Alcohol and Drug-Free School and Workplace Policy 

We expect that members of the University community will take responsibility for their behavior. The intent of this policy is not to allow the University to police the personal lives of individuals or invade their privacy. If, however, individuals, regardless of age, draw the attention of the University to themselves by violating University policy and/or federal, state and local laws, they may be addressed concerning their violation. If they are underage and are in possession or consuming alcohol, they will also be addressed concerning drinking via the University conduct system as administered by the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution or by the appropriate University official.

Student Sanctions for Substance Related Violations 

Disciplinary sanctions will be imposed if a student is found to be in violation of the Student Code of Conduct related to drugs or alcohol. The student conduct process engages students in meaningful self-reflection and is designed to restore the impact on the community in addition to supporting individuals. These sanctions include, but are not limited to, loss of certain privileges, community service, conduct warning, conduct probation, fine or restitution for loss, suspension or dismissal from the university and/or university housing, and referral to alcohol education classes. The university also reserves the right to notify parents of violations by students who are under the applicable legal drinking age. Please see the Student Code of Conduct and Sanctions for more information.

More severe violations may lead to a separation from the university (i.e., Suspension or Dismissal). These include, but are not limited to:

  • Repeatedly violating the alcohol and/or drug policies
  • Selling or distributing alcohol or drugs
  • Driving while under the influence or impaired

Every conduct case involves a multitude of factors that may influence the outcome and sanctions of a case. Hearing officers make decisions on a case-by-case basis. In determining sanctions, university staff considers the student’s present demeanor and past student conduct record, the nature of the incident, the severity of any damage, injury, or harm resulting from the incident, evidence that the student has learned from the experience, and other factors. When appropriate, university staff may assign off-campus alcohol or drug counseling.

Legal Sanctions 

Federal, state, and local drug and alcohol laws provide criminal penalties for the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance, illicit drug, or alcohol. Listed below are some examples of penalties for violations of Rhode Island’s controlled substances and alcoholic beverages laws:

Controlled Substances:

Any person who manufacturers, delivers, or possesses with the intent to manufacture or deliver a Schedule I or II controlled substance may be imprisoned to a term up to life, and/or fined $10,000 to $500,000. For Schedule III or IV controlled substances, such person may be imprisoned for up to twenty (20) years and/or fined up to $40,000. For Schedule V controlled substances, such person may be imprisoned up to one (1) year and/or fined up to $10,000. Any person who knowingly or intentionally possesses a Schedule I, II, III, IV, or V controlled substance in the absence of a valid prescription may be imprisoned for up to three (3) years, and/or fined $500 to $5,000. R.I.G.L. § 21-28-4.01.

Alcoholic Beverages:

Sanctions for misrepresentation of age include (i) a mandatory fine of $100 to $500, thirty (30) hours of community service, and suspension of driving privileges for thirty (30) days for the first offense; (ii) a mandatory fine of $500 to $750, forty (40) hours of community service, and suspension of driving privileges for three (3) months for the second offense; and (iii) a mandatory fine of $750 to $1,000, fifty (50) hours of community service, and suspension of driving privileges for one (1) year for the third and subsequent offenses. R.I.G.L. § 3-8-6.

Sanctions for possession of alcoholic beverages by underage persons include thirty (30) hours of community service, minimum sixty (60) day suspension of driving privileges, and (i) fines of $150 to $750 for the first offense, (ii) fines of $300 to $750 for the second offense, and (iii) fines of $450 to $950 for the third and subsequent offenses. R.I.G.L. § 3-8-10.

Sanctions for furnishing or procuring alcoholic beverages for underage persons include (i) fines of $350 to $1,000 and/or imprisonment up to six (6) months for the first offense, (ii) fines of $750 to $1,000 and/or imprisonment up to one (1) year for the second offense, and (iii) fines of $1,000 to $2,500 and/or imprisonment up to three (3) years for the third or subsequent offenses. R.I.G.L. §§ 3-8-11.1 – 3-8-11.2.

In addition to the examples listed above, additional criminal penalties for violations of federal, state, and local drug and alcohol laws may be found at the following websites. There may be other provisions of federal, state, and local laws related to drugs and alcohol that are not included in this list.

For a list of federal drug trafficking penalties, see
http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ftp3.shtml.

For a list of penalties for violations of the drug and alcohol laws of Rhode Island, see
http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE3/INDEX.HTM (alcoholic beverages);
http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE11/INDEX.HTM (criminal offenses);
http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE21/INDEX.HTM (food and drugs); and
http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE31/INDEX.HTM (motor and other vehicles).

For a list of penalties for violations of local drug and alcohol ordinances, see
http://www.municode.com/RESOURCES/gateway.asp?pid=10105&sid=39 (Bristol);
http://www.portsmouthri.com/ordinances/ (Portsmouth); and
http://www.municode.com/resources/gateway.asp?pid=11458&sid=39 (Providence).

University Resources 

Center for Counseling and Student Development

Center for Student Development • (401) 254-3124
The Roger Williams University Center for Counseling and Student Development assists students through maintaining and enhancing their psychological and emotional well-being and promoting their normal development and maturation. Additionally, a wide offering of educational and support programs are designed to foster student development as healthy, thoughtful, responsible, respectful, and productive members of a diverse community who will be able to function at their full potential.

Health Education Program

Center for Student Development, First Floor Student Life Suite • (401) 254-3413
The Director of Health Education, Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention Coordinator and the Student Health and Wellness Educators (HAWEs) together provide education and support to Roger Williams University students in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The HAWES educate the RWU community about alcohol and other drugs, safe sex and general wellness. Through programs, 1-1 meetings and educational campaigns they motivate individuals to develop the physical, mental, social, intellectual and spiritual dimensions of self and make choices toward a more successful and healthier existence. Examples of their programs and initiatives include:

  • The Alcohol Incident Referral (AIR) Program -A Brief Alcohol Screenings In College Students (BASICS) model. Students violating alcohol or other drug use policies are sanctioned to do the AIR program.
  • Workshops and Presentations (Alcohol and Other Drugs, Nutrition, Stress, Sexual Health)
  • Individual Consultations/Wellness Coaching
  • Resource Library
  • Campus Promotions and Prevention Campaigns
  • AlcoholEdu – mandated Freshmen online program
  • National, Regional and RWU Student Alcohol and Other Drug Use Data Collection and Analysis
  • Social Norm Marketing Campaigns
  • Research and Marketing Internships

Health Services

Center for Student Development, Room 220 • (401) 254-3156
Roger Williams University Health Services is committed to providing undergraduate students quality health care and disease prevention in a manner that exhibits compassion, professionalism, and excellence.

Roger Williams University School of Law 

Student Assistance Program (Available to Law Students)

Ronald N. Mancini, LCMHC & Associates • 366 Hope Street, Bristol, RI 02809 • (401) 253-7575
This group private practice provides mental health services and consultation to individuals, couples, families, and institutions. The clinical staff is comprised of seasoned professionals with a wide variety of specialties and expertise in the newest change strategies known in the fields of Psychology and Psychotherapy. The practice participates with all major insurance companies. A special sliding fee scale is available for law students with no current medical insurance. When utilizing services, please mention that you are associated with Roger Williams University School of Law.

Outside Resources 

Al-Anon/Alateen

106 Rolfe St., Cranston, RI 02910 • (401) 781-0044 • www.riafg.org
Al-Anon is a worldwide fellowship of individuals whose lives have been deeply affected by another’s drinking. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of alcoholism in a relative or friend. Members, who come from all walks of life, meet to share their experience, strength, and hope in order to solve their common problems.

Alcoholics Anonymous

www.rhodeisland-aa.org

410 North Broadway, East Providence, RI 02914 • (401) 438-8860 or (800) 439-8860
2845 Post Road, Room 112, Warwick, RI 02886 • (401) 739-8777
P.O. Box 9342, Providence, RI 02840 • (888) 378-6561
Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism.

Butler Hospital

345 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, RI 02906 • (401) 455-6200 • www.butler.org
Butler Hospital is Rhode Island’s only private, nonprofit psychiatric and substance abuse hospital for adults, adolescents, children, and seniors. Butler is affiliated with The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and is the flagship for its department of psychiatry which has been recognized by its peers as one of the top ten in the United States. Recognized as a national leader in the development of acute, short-term psychiatric and substance abuse treatment, Butler has a reputation for providing the best care available to patients.

CODAC Behavioral Healthcare

www.codacinc.org-a.googlepages.com
1052 Park Ave., Cranston, RI 02910 • (401) 461-5056
349 Huntington Ave., Providence, RI 02909 • (401) 942-1450
93 Thames St., Newport, RI 02840 • (401) 846-4150
350 Columbia St., Wakefield, RI 02879 • (401) 789-0934
850 Waterman Ave., East Providence, RI 02914 • (401) 434-4999
CODAC, a non-profit organization, offers treatment and educational and prevention services. CODAC’s goal is to help people lead a more productive, healthy life by learning to respond effectively to their own needs and the needs of the people they care for without the use of alcohol and other drugs, and free of violence.

Narcotics Anonymous

www.gpana.org

Narcotics Anonymous is a non-profit fellowship or society of men and women for whom drugs had become a major problem and is comprised of recovering addicts who meet regularly to help each other stay clean.

For a full list of Roger Williams University's policies go to the Policies & Guidelines page.