Learning Outcomes and Domains

At Roger Williams University, in an effort to assist students to become active and engaged scholars, the Student Life Division actively promotes student learning and engagement both in and out of the classroom.  We are committed to enriching the learning experience with experiential opportunities and challenges that will prepare our students for their role in an interdependent community.  Our professional staff members are committed to facilitating transformative student-centered experiences and fostering a supportive and inclusive campus that assists students in their personal growth.  We strive to coach students to solve their own problems through development of self-advocacy and resiliency.  Ultimately, we are most proud when our students graduate as active and innovative learners positioned well to succeed as engaged citizens.

In January 2014 the Student Life division adopted seven Co-Curricular Learning Outcomes. Please click on each domain to learn more about the domain and what programs, activities and events we have at RWU that cultivate this learning outcome:     

Leadership Skills

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Learning Outcome:   Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop an understanding of leadership principles and group dynamics.

Descriptors:

  • The ability to organize and collaborate with others around shared interests and sustain productive relationships
  • Understand and articulate one's own leadership style and recognize personal strengths and areas for improvement
  • Demonstrate the confidence to assume formal and informal leadership roles as appropriate to a given situation
  • Recognize group dynamics and facilitate effective group development and teamwork
  • Recognize one's influence with others and use it in positive and ethical ways
  • Promote and develop leadership skills in others

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop leadership skills:

  • Residence Life RA Leadership Development and Training
  • Residence Life RA Selection Group Process Experience
  • RWU Dining Committee
  • Athletics Hawk Leadership Academy session on Leadership
  • Participation in Varsity Athletic Team
  • Health and Wellness Educators (HAWE) present workshops at leadership conferences
  • Students engaged in Student Organizations leadership positions
  • SOAR Leadership Program
  • Club Sport participation
  • Intercultural Leader Award Program
  • Roger After Dark Programming Committee
  • Orientation Advisor Program
  • Eco Reps
  • International Peer Mentors
  • Frosh Program for Athletics
  • Anchor Leadership Conference
  • Students attending national conferences

Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

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Learning Outcome: Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop a set of cognitive, affective and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.

Descriptors:

  • Cultural self-awareness (knowledge): the ability to articulate one’s own cultural biases as the result of one’s lived experiences and recognize and respond to these biases to shift one’s self-description.  I.e., the ability to assess one’s attitudes or biases relative to those who are different; develop alternative responses to cultural biases that may be negative or hurtful to others.
  • Knowledge of cultural worldview frameworks (knowledge): an understanding of the cognitive and affective lens people use to interpret their experiences and make sense of the world around them.  I.e., cultural competency,
  • Empathy (skills):  The capacity to recognize and understand another person’s emotions, situation, or perspective.
  • Verbal and nonverbal communication (skills): the recognition of differences across cultures in verbal and non-verbal forms of communication and the ability to negotiate shared understanding based on those differences. I.e., develop the skills to adapt one’s communication style based on cultural context; recognition of one’s verbal and non-verbal cues that may be offensive or disrespectful to someone from another culture.
  • Curiosity (attitudes): willingness to seek out information about other cultures for the purpose of understanding other diverse perspectives. I.e., ability to describe cultural perspectives of others accurately; actively seeks common ground with those of different backgrounds through mutual understanding.
  • Openness (attitude): Initiating and developing interactions/relationships with culturally diverse others devoid of value-based judgments. I.e., Suspending any culturally based biases of one’s own in getting to know/working with others; actively engaging in organizations/activities/programming that educate about diverse cultures.

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop intercultural and intracultural knowledge and competence:

  • Residential students via RA Programming on Inclusivity
  • Resident Assistants in RA training and development
  • Diversity Leader Program – Mentor Experience
  • Diversity Leader Program – Mentee Experience
  • Unity Day
  • Multicultural Student Union (MSU) programming
  • Student Office workers
  • Cultural Competence for Social Justice (CCSJ) workshop attendees
  • Orientation Adviser experience
  • Alternative Spring Break trips (i.e. Navajo Nation Service Learning trip, Habitat for Humanity)
  • Sexual Advocacy For Everyone (SAFE)
  • Muslim Student Association
  • African Student Coalition
  • Sustained Dialogue
  • Women’s Center
  • Locker Room
  • Spiritual Life Program
  • Conversation Partner Program
  • Gender Neutral Housing
  • Diverse Dining Experiences (e.g., Eid dinner)
  • Barbershop (men of color group)
  • Green Dot
  • Poetry Slam
  • Safe Zone training
  • Global Fest
  • Pride Week

Civic Engagement

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Learning Outcome: Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop the combination of knowledge, skills, values and motivation to make a difference in the civic life of our communities, including participating in activities of personal and public concern that are both individually life-enriching and socially beneficial to the community.

 Descriptors:

  • Sense of civic responsibility: exhibiting a heightened sense of responsibility to one’s community. I.e., working collaboratively to a common aim within a community and its structures; actively participates in campus, local and/or national elections.
  • Commitment to public life through communities of practice: ongoing commitment and involvement in groups with a common interest in some issue or goal working towards solution(s). I.e., continued involvement in student government, local youth groups, etc.
  • Engage in principled dissent: the process of applying appropriate, non-violent expression in situations in which one is not in agreement with the majority or leader of a group/community to which one belongs. I.e., civilly engaging in protest to campus fee increases; articulating alternative viewpoints in a letter to the editor.
  • Effective in leadership: engaging in the relational processes of a group working together towards a common goal or purpose. I.e., ability to communicate a shared vision; ability to inspire others to action; active followership.

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop civic engagement skills:

  • Residential Living
  • Mock Traffic Accident program
  • Thanksgiving Basket for Bristol Food Pantry
  • Community Connections
  • Alternative Spring Break trips (i.e. Navajo Nation Service Learning trip, Habitat)
  • Student Athletic Council service activities
  • University Disciplinary Committee membership
  • Relay for Life
  • Mentor Involvement Program (MIP)
  • Walk a Mile
  • AIDS Project RI HIV Testing
  • Mr. RWU
  • Make A Wish for Hasbro Hospital
  • Student Title IX Task Force
  • Student Conduct Process
  • Women’s Center/Locker Room
  • Social Justice Club/Organizations – SAFE, MSU, ASC, MSA, SD
  • Unity Day
  • It’s On Us campaign
  • Conversation Partners
  • Green Dot program
  • Health & Wellness Fair
  • Dining Services Sustainability initiatives
  • SOAR program
  • Living Learning Community programming
  • Varsity Athletic Team community service
  • Food Recovery Program
  • Eat Local Challenge
  • Crime Prevention Fair
  • Student Senate
  • Orientation Advisor float – Bristol 4th of July Parade
  • V Day fundraiser
  • Helping Hawks – Athletics Public School initiative

Interpersonal & Intrapersonal Competence

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Learning Outcome:   Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop an understanding of themselves and the skills to interact with others and with the greater community.  Competence in this domain includes developing a realistic sense of self and emotions, the ability to foster and maintain healthy, mutually beneficial relationships with others, and the capacity for interdependence and collaboration.

Descriptors:

  • Realistic self-appraisal and self-understanding: the ability to accurately identify and reflect on personal strengths, weaknesses, and life factors, which may be used for establishment of competencies. I.e., ability to describe one’s strengths and areas for growth; ability to describe interests, beliefs and preferences and recognize their impact self.
  • Personal attributes such as identity, self-esteem, confidence, ethics & integrity, spiritual awareness, personal goal setting: the development and expression of positive traits associated with one’s personal identity. I.e., the ability to identify goals and develop action plans to achieve them; congruence between values and actions
  • Meaningful relationships: the ability to engage with others in healthy, mutually beneficial relationship. I.e., ability to sustain intimate relationships; ability to address conflict and negotiate differences with others in working relationships.
  • Interdependence: being mutually responsible to and dependent upon others while maintaining independent identity. I.e., solicits or offers assistance from others as necessary; offers to take work shifts for others and/or help with large office project.
  • Collaboration: the ability to work cooperatively with others towards a joint venture.  I.e., engages team members so as to facilitate their contribution to the work of the group; ability to create a supportive environment
  • Ability to work with people different from self: The ability to work with people of different beliefs, backgrounds, work styles, abilities, and other differences. I.e., Seeks opportunities to work with diverse others in assembling work-teams; ability to adapt communication and work style to a wide range of individuals.

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop interpersonal and intrapersonal competence and skills:

  • Residential Living
  • Resident Assistant personal presentation at RA training
  •  Counseling Center sessions
  • Club Sports
  • Recreational Center Activities
  • Alternative Spring Break trips
  • Spiritual Life Programming
  • Public Safety Student Staffing
  • SAFE Zone Training
  • Student work study program
  • Women’s Center Programming/Locker Room
  • HAWE program
  • Alcohol Incident Referral Program
  • Diversity Leader Mentors
  • Orientation Advisors
  • Sustained Dialogue
  • Mentoring Involvement Program
  • Student Conduct Meetings
  • University Disciplinary Committee membership
  • Health Services Intake Process
  • Food Recovery Network
  • Counseling Center Groups
  • Global Fest
  • Pride Week
  • Psychiatric Appointments in Counseling Center
  • SP&L Team-Building Activities (e.g., Oozeball & Battleship)
  • RWU Dining Committee
  • Social Justice Fair
  • Unity Day

Practical Competence

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Learning Outcome:   Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop a wide range of skills and competencies that translate to everyday life and the ability to manage and author one’s own life.  

Descriptors:

  • Effective communication: the ability to communicate ideas, thoughts or information effectively in written, verbal and non-verbal forms. I.e., ability to express oneself in a well written letter; ability to create an effective presentation for a class or meeting.
  • Capacity to manage one’s personal affairs: the ability to balance multiple aspects of one’s life through organization, planning and action. I.e., ability to arrive at work on time; ability to meet deadlines for assignments and other responsibilities.
  • Economic self-sufficiency & vocational competence: the ability to understand and manage the variety of systems providing aid and support for financial stability and the skills/attitude necessary to functioning in the workplace. I.e., ability to file FAFSA forms to acquire financial aid; ability to carry out work-study duties effectively; holds oneself accountable for obligations.
  • Maintain personal health and wellness: the commitment to balance in all dimensions of wellness, including physical, spiritual, intellectual, social, emotional, and occupational. I.e., utilizes the university fitness facilities regularly; recognizes the signs of excessive alcohol consumption and limits oneself accordingly.
  • Prioritize leisure pursuits: establishing a balance between work and social activities. I.e., the ability to maintain academic performance and hold leadership roles.
  • Living a purposeful and satisfying life: the commitment to planning and actively pursuing personal happiness and fulfillment. I.e., articulating motivations for engagement in specific activities; makes purposeful decisions about variety of academic, social and vocational pursuits.

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop practical competence and skills:

  • Student Work-Study Program
  • Participation in Residential Programs
  • Hawk Leadership Academy session on Hazing
  • Public Safety Parking Attendants
  • Alternative Spring Break Trips
  • Student Conduct Process
  • RWU Student Wine Tasting & Food Pairing Class
  • RWU Dining Etiquette Class
  • Health Services appointments
  • Participation in Counseling sessions & groups
  • Student Life Board of Trustees student representatives
  • Alcohol Incident Referral Session

Apply, Integrate and Reflect

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Learning Outcome:   Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop the competencies and skills to synthesize their experience, analyze situations, apply current knowledge, reflect and as a result learn to solve problems.

Descriptors:

  • Integration: the ability to apply academic knowledge and co-curricular experience to further career and personal goals; be able to research, collect information, experiment and summarize findings; synthesize and associate the connection between, learning, experiences, and skills; and Integrate knowledge to assess strengths and develop of personal autonomy
  • Application: the ability to apply knowledge through personal actions, group participation, audience and group awareness, and leadership; develop life skills and demonstrate the ability to use personal resources and strengths for career development; develop a portfolio to capture and showcase personal accomplishments (E-portfolio, certifications, work experiences, projects, awards, etc.); recognize and identify new ideas to transform knowledge into actions to benefit the greater community; and create a career action plan that continuously seeks opportunities for expanding personal empowerment.
  • Reflection: the ability to recognize and enhance one’s strengths and weaknesses to develop a sense of personal autonomy and empowerment; through the reflection of experiences, explore and refine personal priorities and values through oral and written communication; develop the ability to articulate and discuss the reflection of shared and individual experiences in group settings; and develop the ability to assess and evaluate organizational and personal performance to enhance success.

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop competency and practice application, integration and reflection skills:

  • Residence Living
  • Bystander Intervention Training
  • Diversity Leader Mentor Program
  • HAWE program
  • Orientation Advisors
  • Resident Assistants
  • Rec Center Building Manager
  • Work-study program
  • Dining Committee
  • SOAR Leadership Program
  • Participation in Counseling Center sessions & groups
  • RWU Experience class
  • Athletic teams participation
  • University Disciplinary Committee participation
  • Alcohol Incident Referral Program
  • Alternative Spring Break trips
  • New Student Orientation program
  • Community Connections
  • RA training
  • Women’s Center & Locker Room programming
  • Varsity Athletic Freshman Program
  • Safe Zone training
  • HIV testing session
  • Sustained Dialogue
  • Conversation Partner Program
  • Poetry Slam
  • Spiritual Life programming
  • Eat Local Challenge

Persistence and Student Success

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Learning Outcome:   Students who participate in Student Life programs will develop the competencies and skills to navigate the college experience to accomplish personal and academic success that results in degree attainment.

Descriptors:

  • Manage the college experience to achieve academic and personal success:  the ability to engage in student experiences productively, utilizing resources and services, and taking advantage of available opportunities. I.e., utilizing tutoring services to prepare for challenging tests; structuring academic course plan to spend a semester abroad.
  • Leading to academic goal success including degree attainment: active responsibility for planning one’s academic path, including goal establishment and academic achievement based on personal assessment of ability/needs.  I.e., creating a multi-year course plan in consultation with faculty advisor; recognizing steps required to earn desired GPA.

Examples of Programs, Activities and Services

Below are some examples of programs, activities, and services where students will develop persistence and success skills:

  • Diversity Leader Mentee Program
  • RWU Experience class
  • Counseling sessions & groups
  • Work-study program
  • Health services appointments
  • Participation in clubs and organizations
  • Student Conduct process
  • Co-curricular Transcript
  • Mentor Involvement Program
  • Spiritual Life programming
  • HAWE individual sessions
  • Wellness Coaching
  • Residential Programs participation
  • SOAR Program
  • Anchor Student Leadership Conference
  • Unity Day
  • Hawk Pride Events
  • Athletics All-American Program
  • House Calls Program
  • Commuters in Action
  • Eco Reps