Professional Development

Please review these conferences and special events for professional development opportunities  - either to present or attend.

RWU Special Events & Programs

Click to Open

EVENTS AND PROGRAMS

SPRING 2018

 

  • Faculty and Staff Writers Retreat - January 9 and 10 in the Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored by the Writing Center, Library, and CSALT2.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour -February 1 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM at the Center for Student Development. Co-sponsored by the Divison of Student Life and CSALT2.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Tea - February 13 from 3:00 - 4:00 PM in the Library's Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and CSALT2.
     
  • Hassenfeld Series - Managing a Large, Multi-Section Class for an EE/CE Project. Presenter: Susan Bosco, Ph.D., Professor of Management. February 14 from 2:00 - 3:00 PM in ARCH 239A. Light refreshments will be served.
    Session Description: Doing a CPC project with a large class(es) may seem like an impossible task.  In this seminar, I will share proven methods and tools that will enable you to offer students an energizing experience in this challenging environment while building some new and valuable teamwork skills
     
  • Hassenfeld Series - Strategies for Flexible Integration of Community Engagement into Course Design. Presenter: Charlotte Carrington-Farmer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. February 27 from  2:00 – 3:00 PM.  Library's Mary Tefft White Center. Light refreshments will be served
    Session Description: Dr. Carrington-Farmer will draw on her experience with past CPC projects to cover:
    • The overall highs and lows of CPC
    • The practicalities of integrating CPC into an existing course (within the department and also CORE curriculum), running a CPC project as an independent study, and creating a stand-alone CPC class
    • Integrating projects across disciplines (an example is the History Department working with the Graphic Design Department.)
       
  • Innovations in Teaching Series - Session 3: Using Hypertext to Enable Deep Reading. Presenter: Brett Mckenzie, Ed.D., Professor of Web Development. February 28 from 3:00 - 4:00 PM in SB 206. Light refreshments will be served.
    Session description:  Hypertext — the linking of documents in a computer — has become so commonplace with the World Wide Web that, like computers themselves, it has become almost invisible. In the late eighties, investigations around hypertext became a particularly strong thread in technology research, especially in computing for the humanities. The computer systems at the time to support hypertext required customized software tools, which rarely left the research field. Since then computing tools have developed so that everyday, familiar, commercial tools can now approximate those of the research environment. 

    This presentation applies some of the earlier research on deeply engaged reading by students through the hypertext tools available in the Google suite provided to all RWU students. The implementation was in my fall Senior Seminar and focuses on the Virginia Heffernan’s book, “Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art”. The presentation will cover both the technical aspects of implementation as well as a reflection on the classroom experience.


  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - March 1 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM in the Library Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored with General Education and CSALT2.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Tea - March 27 from 2:30 - 3:30 PM in the Library Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored with Graduate Admissions and CSALT2.
     
  • Hassenfeld Series - Best Practices for Community Engagement Projects. Presenters: Kerri Warren, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology, Steve Esons, Professor of Public Administration, and June Speakman, Professor of Political Science. March 28. Time 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Location: Library Mary Tefft White Center.
     
  • Guest Presentation - Cultural Heritage and the Student of the Pre-Modern.  Presenter: Kisha Tracy, Ph.D. from Fitchburg State University. April 3 from 2:00-3:00 PM in the Library Mary Tefft White Center.

    By drawing cultural heritage parallels, we can emphasize with our students those connections and the shared need for preservation and the study of the past. Participants in this session will rethink the pedagogical implications of the concept of cultural heritage and consider the benefits of bringing instructor hobbies/passions into the classroom. More important, however, is the development of projects based upon active/authentic pedagogical principles that ask students to become collaborators in the photography exhibit as curators and researchers. In this way, they are both learning to connect their local cultural heritage to global cultural heritage and communicating what they learn to local communities, empowering them in terms of their world context and in terms of their relevance to their own environments. Participants will also get the opportunity to participate in the exhibition! For further details see: http://culturalheritagethroughimage.omeka.net/ 

    During this presentation, participants will:

    consider the motivation of students to invest in courses;
    rethink the pedagogical implications of the concept of cultural heritage;
    consider the benefits of bringing instructor hobbies/passions into the classroom;
    explore methods to encourage investment in students;
    design materials and resources to use with cultural heritage in mind.

Kisha G. Tracy is an Associate Professor of English Studies and Co-Coordinator of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Fitchburg State University in Massachusetts. She received her Ph.D. in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut in 2010. Her first book was published by Palgrave in 2017 and is entitled Memory and Confession in Middle English Literature. In addition to this topic, her other research interests include medieval disability, particularly mental illness, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and cultural heritage.

  • Hassenfeld Series - Faculty Roles in Sustaining Community Engagement Projects: Interdisciplinary Case Study. Presenters: Marybeth MacPhee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anthropology; Kerri Warren, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology; and Becky Spritz, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. April 4 from 11:00 AM-Noon. Location: Mary Tefft White Center. 
    Session Description:  Faculty presenters will discuss their case study on the challenges, benefits, logistics and lessons learned of managing an interdisciplinary community engagement project.
     
  • Hassenfeld Series - How to Design and Manage Multi-Semester Projects. Presenter: Kathy Micken, D.B.A.,  Professor of Marketing. April 18:  3:00-4:00 PM. Location: GHH 200
    Session Description: Not all CPC projects fit neatly into one semester. Kathy will discuss some strategies for successfully working on a project across two (or more) semesters. Topics will include managing expectations for both the community partner and the students as well as practical and logistical issues. The very real benefit of the true partnerships that result from such multi-semester projects makes the extra work worthwhile. You’ll also hear about such projects from the student perspective and be able to explore their experiences.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - April 19 from 2:30 - 3:30 PM in the Library Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored by the Enrollment Management Marketing team and CSALT2.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - May 3 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM in the Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored with the Financial Aid Office and Human Resources and CSALT2.

FALL 2017

  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - Thursday, December 14 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM at the Mary Tefft White Center. Co-Sponsored by the Spiegel Center for Global & International Programs and CSALT2
     
  • Hassenfeld Series: Ethical Dimensions of Fair-Trade Experiential Learning: An "Empathy-First" Approach. Presenters: Autumn Quezada-Grant, Paola Prado and members of the Ethical Dimensions of Experiential Learning
     
  • Faculty Learning Community. December 6 from Noon to 1 PM in the Mary Tefft White Center.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - Thursday, November 30 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM at the Mary Tefft White Center. Co-sponsored by the CSAS Student Accessibility Services and CSALT2
     
  • Faculty Book Club - Session 2: November 29 from 2:00 - 3:00 PM in the Recreation Center Room 237 and November 30 from 8:00 - 9:00 AM in the Farmhouse Living Room
     
  • Hassenfeld Series: Deploying Existing RWU Assets to Support Experiential Education. Presenter: Linda Beith. November 28 from 2:30 - 3:30 PM in the Mary Tefft White Center.

  • Innovations in Teaching - Fall 2017 -Session 2 - Teaching Complex Analysis with a Spherical Camera. Presenter: Dr. Robert Jacobson.Thursday, November 16 from 2:00 - 2:50 PM
     
  • Faculty & Staff Coffee Hour - Thursday, November 16 from 10:00 - 11:00 AM at the Mary Tefft White Center. Co-Sponsored by the Center for Spiritual Life and CSALT2
     
  • Teaching Online Certification Course- begins November 6. Registration required.
     
  • Hassenfeld Series:Using a Competitive Team Model for Experiential Projects. Presenter: Dr. Al Cutting. November 15 from 3:00 - 4:00 PM in ARCH 239A.
     
  • Faculty Fun Friday Event - Say it With Seaweed Instead! Facilitator: Dr. Brian Wysor. November 3 from 2:00 - 4:00 PM in the Bready Sailing Center.
     
  • Faculty & Staff Coffee Hour- Thursday, November 2from 10:00-11:00 AM at the Mary Tefft White Center. Co-Sponsored by the Community Partnership Center and Community Engagement and CSALT2
     
  • Faculty Book Club - Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria. Session 1.October 26 from 8:00 - 9:00 AM and November 1 from 2:00 - 3:00 PM in the Farmhouse Living Room
     
  • Innovations in Teaching - Fall 2017 Session 1 - Using Technology in the Classroom to Promote Learning. Presenter: Dr. Rosalie Franks. Wednesday, October 25 from 2:00 - 2:50 PM
     
  • Hassenfeld Series: Preparing Students for Community-Engaged Project Management. Presenter: Hank Kniskern. October 24 from 3:00 - 4:00 PM in ARCH 239A.
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - Thursday, October 19 from 10:00-11:00 AM in the Mary Tefft White Center, University Library. Co-Sponsored by the Center for Career and Professional Development and CSALT2
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - Thursday, October 5from 10:00-11:00 AM in the Mary Tefft White Center, University Library. Co-Sponsored by CSAS - Advising and Peer Mentoring and CSALT2
     
  • Faculty and Staff Coffee Hour - Thursday, September 21 from 10-11 AM in the Mary Tefft White Center, University Library. Sponsored by CSALT2.
     
  • Fall Faculty Conference- Tuesday, August 29. Topic - Supporting Student Engagement in Difficult Dialogues in the Classroom and the Campus Community.  Guest speaker: Libby Roderick, Associate Director of the Center for Faculty Excellence, University of Alaska.
     
  • New Faculty Orientation - Wednesday, August 23.
     
  • CORE Pedagogical Summit- Thursday, August 17.
     
  • Suicide Prevention/QPR Training - Monday, August 7. Advancement of Teaching and Learning staff. Facilitator: Maureen Minarik, Ph.D. from the Counseling Center.

SPRING 2017 

  • Rhode Island Teaching & Learning Consortium (RITL) sponsored aBlended Course Design workshop hosted by RWU on June 7, 2017. This all-day workshop was facilitated by Dr. Katie Linder from Oregon State University. This event brought together faculty from 5 RI institutions (PC, URI, NEIT, CCRI and RWU) who are interested in developing a hybrid or blended course. All participants received a copy of Dr. LInder's book The Blended Course Design Workbook.
     
  • Fourth Semi-Annual RWU Faculty and Staff Writers Retreat - Tuesday, May 23 - Wednesday, May 24.  This event was co-sponsored by the Writing Center, the University Library and CSALT2.
     
  • Huddewall display demonstrations were held on April 12 at noon, 2 PM and 3:30 PM in SE 115.
     
  • Congratulations to the new Open Educational Resources (OER) Fellows for 2017: Paula Bailey, Bob Dermody, Peter Hahn, Heather Micelli, Kathy Micken, Chantelle Messier and Janine Weisman. 
     
  • Faculty and Staff Writers' Retreat - Tuesday, January 10 - Wednesday, January 11 in the University Library. 
     
  • Reacting to the Past (RTTP) Faculty Fellows program.

FALL 2016

  • OER Fellows Showcase - Friday, December 9 from 2:00-4:00 PM in the Library Instruction Lab (LIL).
     
  • Innovations in Teaching Fall 2016 - Session 2. Fostering Reflection and Metacognition through Journaling. Presenters: Brian Wysor, Ph.D. and Donna Dimery, M.Ed. November 30, 2016
     
  • Innovations in Teaching Fall 2016 - Session 1. Using an Interactive Syllabus. Presenter: Jason Jacobs, Ph.D.  November 9, 2016
     
  • Learning Assessment Techniques: How to Integrate New Activities that Gauge What and How Well Students Learn webinar - October 27, 2016
     
  • SoTL Fellows Follow-Up - Wednesday, October 12, 2016, 3:00 PM in the LIL
     
  • OER Faculty Fellows Meeting - September 28, 2016
     
  • Socrates Cafe - September 21, 2016 Moderated by Bob Shea: Should privacy be sacrificed for the public good?
     
  • Anthropology & Sociology Assessment Workshop - September 12, 2016
     
  • Fall Faculty Conference - Tuesday, August 30, 2016. Topics include: update on Experiential Learning Taskforce; Fostering Academic Integrity
     
  • Living Learning Community Faculty Workshop - August 25, 2016
     
  • New Faculty Orientation - August 23, 2016
     
  • CORE Summit - August 18, 2016
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Metro) - August 24
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Metro) - August 23
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Online) - August 22
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Bristol) - August 19
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Bristol) - August 17
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Bristol) - August 15
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Bristol) - August 11
     
  • Faculty Bridges Semester Quick Start (Bristol) - August 9
     

SPRING 2016 

  • Reacting To The Past Faculty Fellows - Barnard Summer Institute -  June 9-12, 2016
     
  • SoTL Summer Institute - June 7, 2016
     
  • Faculty & Staff Writers Retreat- June 2016
     
  • Teaching Online Certification Course (self-paced, online): May - August 2016
     
  • Honors Program Workshop - May 16, 2016
     
  • Make It Developmental: Building a Process for Student Development webinar- Tara Harvey. May 19,  2016
     
  • Open Educational Resources (OER) Faculty Fellows
    • Workshop – April 22, 2016
    • Workshop – April 29, 2016
       
  • Key Concepts for Overworked International Educators: Lessons Learned in Putting Theory into Action webinar- Janet Bennett. April 21, 2016
     
  • Developmental Learning for Intercultural Competence webinar- Michael Paige. March 17, 2016
     
  • Intercultural Learning Courses Before and After Study Abroad: Four Decades of Preparing Students for International Education Experiences webinar - Bruce La Brack. February 18, 2016
     
  • Reacting to the Past Faculty Fellows (RTTP): Role Playing Workshop - February 2, 2016
     
  • Intercultural Learning Through Education Abroad: Theories, Processes and Practices webinar- Mick Vande Berg, lead editor of Student Learning Abroad: What Our Students Are Learning, What They’re Not, and What We Can Do about It. January 21, 2016
     
  • Faculty & Staff Writers Retreat- January 2016
     
  • Center for Student Academic Success (CSAS) Winter Retreat - January 11, 2016

Teaching and Learning @ RWU Podcast Series

Click to Open

Welcome to this podcast series on teaching and learning hosted by Associate Provost Bob Shea.

Photo of Associate Provost Bob Shea

September 28, 2017 - Talking about the Roger Seminar  with Dr. Jason Jacobs

January 18, 2018 Talking about Community Engagement with Arnold Robinson, AICP

 

Hassenfeld Project Series 2017-2018

Click to Open

Thanks to the generous grant from Alan Hassenfeld and the Hassenfeld Family Initiatives LLC, RWU has embarked on an intensive, three-year initiative to expand and enhance its innovative work in experiential education. A portion of that grant is dedicated to professional development for faculty who are committed to experiential learning and community engagement.

In addition to a Hassenfeld Fellows program, the following workshops will be offered to all faculty interested in enhancing experiential education and active learning with their students.

2018 SPRING SEMESTER

Topic: Managing a Large Class, Multi-Section Class for an EE/CE Project
Presenter: Sue Bosco
Date: Wednesday, February 14
Time: 2-3 PM
Location: ARCH 239A

Professor Sue Bosco's presentation video: 

 

Topic: Strategies for Flexible Integration of Community Engagement into Course Design
Presenter: Charlotte Carrington-Farmer
Date: Tuesday, February 27
Time: 2-3 PM
Location: Mary Tefft White Center

Professor Charlotte Carrington-Farmer's presentation video:

 

Topic: Best Practices for Community Engagement Projects
Presenters: Kerri Warren, Steve Esons, and June Speakman
Date: Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Time:  1:00 - 2:00 PM
Location: Mary Tefft White Center

Professor's Kerri Warren, Steve Esons, and June Speakman presentation video:

 

Topic: Faculty Roles in Sustaining Community Engagement Projects: Interdisciplinary Case Study
Presenters: Marybeth MacPhee, Becky Spritz, and Kerri Warren
Date:  Wednesday, April 4
Time:  11:00 AM - Noon
Location: Mary Tefft White Center

Professor's Marybeth MacPhee, Becky Spritz, and Kerri Warren presentation video: 

 

Topic:  How to Manage Multi-Semester Projects
Presenter: Kathy Micken
Date – Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Time:  3:00 – 4:00 PM
Location: GHH 200

Professor Kathy Micken's presentation video:

 

2017 FALL SEMESTER

Topic: Preparing Students for Community-Engaged Project Management
Presenter: Hank Kniskern
Date: Tuesday, October 24
Time: 3-4 PM
Location: ARCH 239A

 

Topic: Using a Competitive Model for an Experiential Project
Presenter: Al Cutting
Date: Wednesday, November 15
Time: 3-4 PM
Location: ARCH 239A

Topic: Deploying Existing RWU Assets to Support Experiential Education and Community Engagement
Presenter: Linda Beith
Date: Tuesday, November 28
Time: 2:30- 3:30
Location: Mary Tefft White Center

Topic: Ethical Considerations of Experiential Education
Presenters – Paola Prado and Autumn Quezada-Grant
Date: December 6
Time: Noon to 1 PM
Location: Mary Tefft White Center

 

Faculty Learning Communities

Click to Open

Faculty Fellows Programs for 2017-2018

  • Hassenfeld Fellows
  • Reacting to the Past (RTTP)
  • Open Education Resources (OER) Fellows

Faculty Learning Communities for 2017-2018

  • New Faculty Learning Community - Facilitators Erin Tooley and Lori Lee Wallace
  • Ethical Dimensions of Experiential Learning - Facilitators Autumn Quezada-Grant and Paola Prado

Faculty Learning Communities for 2016-17 include:

  • New Faculty Learning Community: Co-facilitators Erin Tooley and Sara Shirley
  • Ethical Dimensions of Experiential Learning: Co-facilitators Autumn Quezada-Grant and Paola Prado

Past Faculty Learning Communities

  • Quantitative Teaching & Learning Community: Co-facilitators Rupayan Gupta and Adria Updike 
  • Community Engagement Learning Community: Co-facilitators Steve Esons and Kerri Warren

Innovations In Teaching Series

Click to Open

Each year we celebrate RWU faculty expertise in teaching with an Innovations in Teaching Showcase event held during the academic year. Each session has a theme and brief presentation(s) by an RWU faculty member(s) followed by an opportunity for sharing ideas, perspectives, strategies, etc.

Innovations in Teaching Series - Fall 2017 & Spring 2018

Session 1 - Using Technology in the Classroom to Promote Learning presented by Rosalie Franks, Ed.D. Wednesday, October 25,2017, from 2:00 - 2:50 PM in Library Instruction Lab (LIL)

This past summer Dr. Rosalie Franks (FCAS) participated in a six-day Digital Literacy Institute sponsored by URI’s Media Education Lab. During this Institute, she developed a media project with a dyad partner as part of their project-based learning assignment. The new tools and strategies she learned during this experience have prompted her to change her own classroom assignments for students to encompass some of the latest digital tools.

Dr. Franks demonstrated her own project as well as showcased some of her students’ original videos. Handouts will also be provided on her project as well as 20 Things Educators Need to Know About Digital Literacy Skills. She will briefly explore the early use of technology in the classroom and then examine how teachers and students today need to apply it in our 21st-century digital world.

View the recording of the session for Rosalie Franks, Ed.D.:

 

Session 2: Teaching Complex Analysis with a Spherical Camera. Presenter: Robert Jacobson, Ph.D. Thursday, November 16, 2017 from 2:00 - 2:50 PM in MNS 214

This talk describes one professor's experience incorporating the use of a spherical camera in teaching mathematics by assigning projects incorporating spherical photos in which students build physical objects that illustrate mathematical concepts, participate in peer instruction, and communicate their work to a general audience.

View the recording of the session for Robert Jacobson,Ph.D.:

 

Session 3: Using Hypertext to Enable Deep Reading. Presenter: Brett McKenzie, Ed.D. Wednesday, February 28, 2018 from 3:00 - 4:00 PM in SB 206.

Hypertext — the linking of documents in a computer — has become so commonplace with the World Wide Web that, like computers themselves, it has become almost invisible. In the late eighties, investigations around hypertext became a particularly strong thread in technology research, especially in computing for the humanities. The computer systems at the time to support hypertext required customized software tools, which rarely left the research field. Since then computing tools have developed so that everyday, familiar, commercial tools can now approximate those of the research environment. 

This presentation applies some of the earlier research on deeply engaged reading by students through the hypertext tools available in the Google suite provided to all RWU students. The implementation was in my fall Senior Seminar and focuses on the Virginia Heffernan’s book, “Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art”. The presentation will cover both the technical aspects of implementation as well as a reflection on the classroom experience.

View the recording of the session for Brett McKenzie,Ed.D.:

 

Session 4 (Guest Presentation) - Cultural Heritage and the Student of the Pre-Modern.  Presenter: Kisha Tracy, Ph.D. from Fitchburg State University. April 3 from 2:00-3:00 PM in the Library Mary Tefft White Center.

By drawing cultural heritage parallels, we can emphasize with our students those connections and the shared need for preservation and the study of the past. Participants in this session will rethink the pedagogical implications of the concept of cultural heritage and consider the benefits of bringing instructor hobbies/passions into the classroom. More important, however, is the development of projects based upon active/authentic pedagogical principles that ask students to become collaborators in the photography exhibit as curators and researchers. In this way, they are both learning to connect their local cultural heritage to global cultural heritage and communicating what they learn to local communities, empowering them in terms of their world context and in terms of their relevance to their own environments. Participants will also get the opportunity to participate in the exhibition! For further details see: http://culturalheritagethroughimage.omeka.net/ 

During this presentation, participants will:

consider the motivation of students to invest in courses;
rethink the pedagogical implications of the concept of cultural heritage;
consider the benefits of bringing instructor hobbies/passions into the classroom;
explore methods to encourage investment in students;
design materials and resources to use with cultural heritage in mind.

Kisha G. Tracy is an Associate Professor of English Studies and Co-Coordinator of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Fitchburg State University in Massachusetts. She received her Ph.D. in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut in 2010. Her first book was published by Palgrave in 2017 and is entitled Memory and Confession in Middle English Literature. In addition to this topic, her other research interests include medieval disability, particularly mental illness, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and cultural heritage.

View Dr. Tracy's Presentation

photo of Kisha_Sarcophagi


Innovations in Teaching Series - Spring 2017

This is the 3rd in a series in Spring 2017 semester is being sponsored by Center for Scholarship, Assessment, Learning, Teaching, & Technology (CSALT²). 
 
Session 3 - Creating/Selecting Open Educational Resources presented by Paul Webb, Ph.D. and Marci Recher, Ph.D.
Friday, March 24, 2017 from 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM in Library Instruction Lab (LIL)
 
The Open Educational Resources (OER) movement is dedicated to providing high quality materials that can be used for teaching, learning or research that are of little or no cost. Our two presenters are OER Fellows and will be sharing the benefits and challenges of designing, developing, selecting, and distributing OER materials to
their classes (and colleagues!) as well as their assessment of the effects on student performance and success.
 
Please check the OER resources collection at RWU often for new resources. Want to learn more about adopting OER for your course? Contact Lindsey Gumb, RWU Instructional Technology Librarian, via email at lgumb@rwu.edu or phone 401-254-3225.

Marci Recher's PowerPoint Presentation

View the recording of the session for Paul Webb, Ph.D.:
 
 

Innovations in Teaching Series - Fall 2016

This series of the Fall 2016 semester is being sponsored by Center for Scholarship, Assessment, Learning, Teaching, & Technology (CSALT²). 
 
Session 1 - Using an Interactive Syllabus presented by Jason Jacobs, Ph.D.
Wednesday, November 9, 2016 from 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM in Library Instruction Lab (LIL)
 
Creating an interactive format for a syllabus in Bridges allows an instructor to build student engagement, interactivity and accountability in and out of the classroom. Join us for this session to see one approach to organize and sequence resources and activities like assignments, forum discussions, and quizzes by class, by week or by module. This allows students anytime-anywhere access to what is needed and when for a course.
 
View the recording of the session:
 
 
Session 2 - Fostering Reflection and Metacognition through Journaling
Wednesday, November 30, 2016 from noon to 12:50 PM in Library Instruction Lab (LIL)
 
Journaling is a simple strategy that has a powerful effect on learning. When students reflect on a learning experience they draw on both cognitive and emotional information to make meaning. In this session the presenters will demonstrate how they have used different approaches to journaling, both private and shared, to engage and deepen the learning of their students.
 
 
View the recordings for each session below:
 
  • Donna Dimery's Video Presentation
 
  • Brian Wysor's Video Presentation
 

Innovations in Teaching Series - Spring 2016

This first series of the Spring 2016 semester is being co-sponsored by Instructional Design & Technologies and the Center for Teaching and Learning. 
 
Session 1 - Capture everything with Evernote presented by Raquel Ortiz, Assistant Dean for Library and Information Services, Associate Professor of Law
Thursday, February 25, 2016 from 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM in Library Instruction Lab
 
Have you ever wished that you had a single digital file cabinet to organize all your files, as well as notes, tweets, quotes, projects, photos, web pages, special email messages, and random bits of information? Would you also like to be able to get to your digital file cabinet from any device? How about if this digital file cabinet was free and easy to access?
 
Evernote is a multi-platform, mobile friendly tool used by many professionals to save and share information. In this demo, you will see how to add different types of content to Evernote, how to organize content in Evernote, the basics of searching Evernote, how to share content with others, and resources that exist to help you use Evernote to its full potential.
 
Session 2 - Online Course Tools and the Live Classroom presented by Tony Hollingsworth, PhD. from the Department of Foreign Languages in the Feinstein College of Arts and Sciences
Thursday, March 24, 2016 from 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM in the Mary Tefft White Cultural Center, Learning Commons
 
Developing online courses introduces instructors to a variety of new challenges and new tools to meet those challenges. Many of these tools, ironically, enhance the classroom experience as well. These tools directly address the need for student engagement, repetition and feedback. In this lecture, we will explore how to use several of these tools (i.e. LiveScribe, Adobe Captivate, MS OneNote, Camtasia) in both virtual and live settings in order to make a livelier and richer learning experience.
 
View the recording of the session:
 

Innovations in Teaching Series - Fall 2015

This first series of the Fall 2015 semester is being co-sponsored by Instructional Design & Technologies and the Center for Teaching and Learning. 
 
Session 1 - Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students and Saving Faculty Time presented by Roxanne O'Connell, Department of Communication & Graphic Design
Tuesday, October 20, 2015 from 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM in GHH 300
 
Looking for a practical and EFFECTIVE way to motivate students, eliminate grade negotiations, and recover some of your precious time? What if there was a way to help your students become more responsible and accountable without having to nag them into completing work? What if your course syllabus helped students see exactly what is needed to get the grade they want? Dr. Roxanne O’Connell has experimented with Specifications Grading in her classes and will report on the benefits and challenges she and her students have discovered.
 
Session 2 - Never Miss Class Again! Leveraging Technology for Just-in-Time, Just-in-Case Learning presented by Lynn Ruggieri, JD, CPA/CFE from the Department of Accounting in the Gabelli School of Business
Thursday, November 12, 2015 from 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM in ARCH 239A
 
Technology has allowed courses to be delivered to students anytime, anywhere. However these same technologies can provide a solution to address individual class disruptions caused by weather, illness, travel or conference participation. Lynn Ruggieri, JD, CPA/CFE from the MJG School of Business will describe strategies she has used to guarantee that you will never miss class again.

View the recording of the session:
 

Review the Sessoin Handout on technology strategies to deal with weather, illness, travel or other interruptions in class time. Need help or additional info? Contact the ID team at: id@rwu.edu or call 401-254-3187.

Session 3: Back to the Future: How Emerging Technologies Can Change How We Teach and Learn presented by Russell Beauchemin, M.A. RWU School of Continuing Studies, RWU Instructional Design & Technlolgies and YearUp Providence.
Wednesday, December 2 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM in the Mary Tefft White Cultural Center
 
Emerging technologies are offering new opportunities for teaching and learning. This session will demonstrate some cutting edge technologies and also allow some hands-on exploration. Technologies covered are:
  • A tele-presence robot for increasing engagement and participation for online learners.
  • A Circuit-Scribe pen that can draw circuits which can be used to demonstrate electricity
  • iSense 3d Scanner for the iPad
  • Drone photography/videography

View the recording of the session:

 

Innovations in Teaching Series - Spring 2015

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 from 3 PM - 4 PM in GHH 300

This year’s Showcase will feature Charlotte Carrington-Farmer from the History/American Studies Department and Hank Kniskern from the Gabelli School of Business who will share their experiences with managing Community Partnerships Center (CPC) projects with their students. According to their website, CPC projects “provide assistance to nonprofit organizations, municipalities, government agencies and low to moderate communities in Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts.” These projects provide students true experiential learning in real-world settings where their work matters. Both Charlotte and Hank will talk about the benefits and challenges for faculty and students in taking on a CPC project. For examples of current and past CPC projects see the CPC website.
 
 

 

Innovations in Teaching Series 2014

Innovations in Teaching 2014 Brochure
Innovations in Teaching 2014 was offered three sessions this spring.

Session 1 - Using Qualtrics for Research:  You, Your Students, and Your Classes by Kathleen Micken, D.B.A., Professor of Marketing, Gabelli School of Business
February 20, 2014   11-11:50 AM
Session Description: Now that RWU has a site license for the Qualtrics online survey software, do you wish you knew more about how to use it? This presentation will provide an introduction to Qualtrics, plus information about some of its advanced features that make survey research a little easier. The discussion uses classroom Community Partnerships Center projects as examples to illustrate the many ways that Qualtrics can facilitate different kinds of research studies.

Qualtrics PowerPoint Presentation by Kathy Micken

Session 2 - Think-Pair-Share & Clickers in the Classroom by Adria Updike, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics, School of Engineering
March 5, 2014  2-2:50 PM
Session Description: Think-Pair-Share is a cooperative learning strategy that provides some time and structure for students to think about a topic, concept  or problem individually, then share their thoughts with a peer. Including clickers with this technique allows for a broader formative assessment of student learning. This is an easy and engaging strategy that can fit into any classroom.

Think-Pair-Share & Clickers in the Classroom PowerPoint Presentation by Adria Updike

Session 3 - Writing Fellows Pilot Program by Margaret Case, Ph.D., CAS  Associate Professor of English;  Matthew Ulricksen, M.A., Adjunct Professor, CAS Political Science; and Karen Bilotti, M.A., Associate Director for Tutorial Support Services & Coordinator of the Writing Center
April 16, 2014 11-11:50 AM
Session Description:   One English course and one Political Science course partnered with the Writing Center for the 2013-14 academic year to pilot embedded Writing Fellows for students. Each Writing Fellow worked with 3 or 4 assigned students for the duration of the semester, fostering relationships through written and face-to-face exchanges during the revision process. The presenters will describe this collaborative effort and report on its effectiveness so far in improving student writing along with plans for expansion.

Writing Fellows Pilot Program PowerPoint Presentation by Karen Bilotti, Meg Case, and Mat Ulrickson

Innovations in Teaching Series 2013

The Innovations in Teaching 2013 Showcase included three sessions, one held each month beginning in February.
Innovations in Teaching 2013 brochure

Session 1 - Applying Inquiry-Based Learning by Jennifer Pearce, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in CAS Department of Chemistry and Physics
February 21, 2013

Session 2 - Using iPads in the Classroom by Kelly Donnell, Associate Professor; Madge Thombs, Professor and Li-Ling Yang, Assistant Professor. School of Education.  March 22, 2013

Session 3 - Flipping Lessons in a College Course by Loren Byrne, Assistant Professor and Kerri Warren, Associate Professor. Department of Biology, Marine Biology and Environmental Science.

Innovations in Teaching Series 2012

Innovations in Teaching 2012 Brochure

Organizing and Delivering an Online Course by Nancy Craven, Writing, Rhetoric & Composition; and Amiee Shelton, Ph.D., Communication. February 24, 2012

Clogs, Blogs and Forums: Enhancing Communication and Collaboration by Michael Swanson, Ph.D., American Studies; and Fred Gould, PE., C.P.C., Construction Management. March 9, 2012

Fostering Student Reflections using Portfolios by Cliff Timpson, Ph.D., Chemistry; and Kelly Donnell, Ph.D., School of Education.  March 23, 2012

Student Engagement, Interaction and Feedback by Kathryn Thompson, J.D., Law School; Chris Menton, Ed.D., Criminal Justice; Nancy Breen, Ph.D., Chemistry and Brett McKenzie, Ed.D., Business. April 5, 2012

Using Prezi to Promote Reflective Practice by Jim Beitler, Ph.D., Writing, Rhetoric & Composition.  April 20, 2012

Innovations in Teaching Showcase 2011

Innovations in Teaching 2011 Brochure
Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

This event featured three faculty members drawn from across all departments who graciously shared with colleagues a strategy or technology and using ePortfolios. See agenda and session descriptions.

From Vision to Reality by Gregory Laramie and David Corbin, School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation.

Mixing Elements of E-Portfolios with Upper-Level Chemistry Students: An "Alchemist's Dream" or "No Reaction"? (ppt) by Cliff Timpson, Ph.D., Chemistry.

A Dynamic e-Duo: Creating Complementary Electronic Portfolios to Enhance Student Learning (ppt) by Jim Beitler, Ph.D., Writing, Rhetoric and Composition.

Innovations in Teaching Showcase 2009

Innovations in Teaching 2009 Brochure
Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

This event featured seven faculty drawn from across all departments who graciously shared with colleagues a strategy or technology that has enhanced the teaching and/or learning in their classes.

Take a Byte Out of Greek (video) by Tony Hollingsworth, Ph.D. Foreign Languages

Digital Manufacturing Integration with Architectural Design (video) by Andrew Thurlow, M.Arch.

Using Blackboard to Manage Undergraduate and Graduate Courses (video) by Michael Hall, Ph.D., Public Administration

Are They Getting This?  (video) by Matthew Stein, Ph.D., Engineering.

Just Click:  Assess and Engage (video) by Madge Thombs, Ph.D.

Simple Screen Casting (video) by W. Brett McKenzie, Ed.D., Business

Video as a Field R&D Tool: A User's Guide (video) by Michael Scully, M.A.,

Conferences

Click to Open

Fostering Academic Success in STEM Conference (Science of Learning). April 27, 2018. The University of New Hampshire.

Magna Publications: The Teaching Professor Conference. June 1-3, 2-18, Atlanta, GA.

New England Faculty Development Consortium (NEFDC) Annual Spring Conference: The Role of the Affective Domain in Teaching and Learning. June 8, 2018. Lasell College, Newton, MA.

Global Interdisciplinary Conference: Green Cities, Business, Engineering, Technology & Design, at ICN Business School – ARTEM Campus, June 27 - 30, 2018, Nancy, France.

International Association for the Study of Culture of Cities (IASCC) Annual Conference. Intangible Heritage: Scenes of Urban Innovation. July 10-13, 2017. Athens, Greece.

AAC&U Global Engagement and Spaces of Practice: Exploring Global Challenges across Disciplinary Boundaries. October 11-13, 2018. Seattle, WA.

*Note that RWU subscribes to the following organizations so you can register for sponsored  events as a member:

Professional Development Site

Click to Open

There is a Faculty Learning and Resources Lab site created on Bridges for just-in-time support for all faculty. The site contains videos and print documentation on most instructional tools within Bridges and beyond Bridges. Note that this site requires a log in.