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History

The study of history increases our capacity to think critically and to form independent judgments. Examination of various ages and cultures helps students understand the present world and intelligently anticipate the future.

The History program at Roger Williams University is designed to introduce students to the practice of history in both regional and national contexts. Among the courses are offerings on the histories of Europe (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Revolution, Modern), the United States (Colonial, Revolution, Civil War, Gilded Age, Great Depression), Asia (Modern East Asia, China, Japan, Korea), Africa (Modern Africa, South Africa, Egypt, Congo) and Latin America (Colonial Latin America, Mexico, Brazil, Andes).

History majors are encouraged to involve themselves in off-campus programs of study and internships, particularly the Great Cities Program, which gives students the opportunity to experience directly and to enjoy the history and culture of some of the great cities of the world such as London, Paris, Dublin, Jerusalem, Athens, Rome, Chicago and Quebec City.

The study of history is an excellent preparation for careers in law, business, government, education, library science and the national park service or as an archivist or local historian. Our History majors teach and practice law, co-author papers and present at international conferences and create independent research projects.

Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. 1. Use and interpret a variety of sources, including:
    a. primary documents
    b. secondary monographs and scholarly articles
    c. maps, graphs, and charts
    d. visual media, including photographs, film, and video recordings
    e. cultural artifacts
  2. Think abstractly and theoretically about history, such as
    a. understanding the difference between “history” as a disciplinary activity and “the past” as a collection of events
    b. recognizing evolution and change as central to historical studies
    c. recognizing that there are competing theories of history
    d. accepting the possible validity of multiple points of view
  3. Undertake historical research, including:
    a. defining a topic appropriate to the nature of the assignment
    b. locating appropriate resources
    c. assessing the value of information
    d. placing collected information in an appropriate context
    e. extracting ideas from resources objectively and fairly
  4. Present and defend interpretations in a variety of ways, including:
    a. demonstrating respect for their own ideas through the quality of the work they present
    b. writing coherent essays of various lengths
    c. documenting work appropriately and consistently
    d. speaking with clarity about their work in formal and/or informal venues
  5. Demonstrate historical literacy for a specific historic period, including:
    a. constructing valid chronologies for events or movements
    b. using causation and casual chains to explain events
    c. recognizing significant events and personalities
    d. incorporating the concerns of marginalized and minority groups
Matthew Ulricksen
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-2447

Matthew Ulricksen

Matthew
Ulricksen
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-2447
John Parrillo
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information

John Parrillo

John
Parrillo
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
Shamiran Mako
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3660

Shamiran Mako

Shamiran
Mako
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3660
Benjamin Lefkowitz
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information

Benjamin Lefkowitz

Benjamin
Lefkowitz
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
Joseph Lafauci
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035

Joseph Lafauci

Joseph
Lafauci
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035
Joseph Fulginiti
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035

Joseph Fulginiti

Joseph
Fulginiti
Adjunct Professor
Contact Information
(401) 254-3035
Charlotte Carrington-Farmer
Assistant Professor of History

University of Cambridge

View Curriculum Vitae »
Contact Information
(401) 254-3095
GHH 211
Areas of Expertise: 
Colonial America; the Atlantic world; slavery in America; Native American history; dissent, deviance and crime in early America

Charlotte Carrington-Farmer

Charlotte
Carrington-Farmer
Assistant Professor of History

University of Cambridge

sites/default/files/faculty-staff/cv/cv_dr_charlotte_carrington-farmer_1.pdf
Contact Information
(401) 254-3095
GHH 211
Areas of Expertise: 
Colonial America; the Atlantic world; slavery in America; Native American history; dissent, deviance and crime in early America

Dr. Charlotte Carrington-Farmer is an Assistant Professor of History, and she specializes in early American History. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge (Trinity Hall) in 2010. Her dissertation was entitled 'Dissent and Identity in Seventeenth-Century New England', and is now a book project. Dr Carrington-Farmer's research interests center on framing dissent, deviance and crime in early America in a wider Atlantic World context. Dr. Carrington-Farmer is particularly interested in Thomas Morton, who founded the Ma-re Mount settlement (modern-day Quincy, MA), and she has written a biography of Morton for a book entitled Atlantic Biographies: Individuals and Peoples in the Atlantic World (Brill, 2013). Dr. Carrington-Farmer has reviewed a number of books for History: Reviews of New Books. She has also written the following article: 'Slave Horse/War Horse: The Narragansett Pacer in Colonial and Revolutionary Rhode Island’ War Horses of the World Proceedings (SOAS University of London, forthcoming 2014). Her new book project is tentatively titled: Slave Horse: The Narragansett Pacer in the Atlantic World.

Jennifer L. Stevens, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of American Studies/US History

B.A. Carleton College
M.A.T. National-Louis University
M.A. Bowling Green State University
Ph.D. Michigan State University

Contact Information
x5698
GHH 217
Areas of Expertise: 
American cultural studies; 20th century United States History

Jennifer L. Stevens

Jennifer L.
Stevens
Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of American Studies/US History

B.A. Carleton College
M.A.T. National-Louis University
M.A. Bowling Green State University
Ph.D. Michigan State University

Contact Information
x5698
GHH 217
Areas of Expertise: 
American cultural studies; 20th century United States History

Background                                                                                                                

Autumn Quezada-Grant, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History

University of Mississippi, Ph.D. Latin American History 2010
Northwestern State University, M.A. History 2002
Louisiana Tech University, B.A. History 1997

View Curriculum Vitae »
Contact Information
x3024
GHH 213
Areas of Expertise: 
Latin American History, Indigenous History, Human Rights, Revolutions and Social Justice

Autumn Quezada-Grant

Autumn
Quezada-Grant
Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History

University of Mississippi, Ph.D. Latin American History 2010
Northwestern State University, M.A. History 2002
Louisiana Tech University, B.A. History 1997

sites/default/files/faculty-staff/cv/_aqg_2_page_cv.pdf
Contact Information
x3024
GHH 213
Areas of Expertise: 
Latin American History, Indigenous History, Human Rights, Revolutions and Social Justice

Autumn Quezada-Grant is an Assistant Professor of History. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Mississippi in 2010, in Latin American History. Dr. Quezada-Grant has a broad research interest, which includes modern Latin America, indigenous history, social justice, and human rights. As co-advisor for RWU’s Chapter of FIMRC, she leads service-learning trips throughout Latin America, linking together intersections of social justice, history and public health for undergraduate students. In January, she will co-teach an immersion-service, study abroad course titled “Social Justice in Hispaniola.” In the past, she has taught a study abroad course in El Salvador. Watch the video of photos from El Salvador.

Her blog can be found at    https://otonomoon.wordpress.com 

Publishing

Debra Ann Mulligan, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History

B.A. Rhode Island College
M.A., Ph.D. Providence College

Contact Information
x3779
GHH 221

Debra Ann Mulligan

Debra Ann
Mulligan
Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History

B.A. Rhode Island College
M.A., Ph.D. Providence College

Contact Information
x3779
GHH 221