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Anthropology + Sociology

The Anthropology + Sociology major at Roger Williams University is unique in its structure. Unlike other schools, RWU focuses on two social science disciplines together, as anthropology and sociology both examine social groups, culture and community on a local and global scale to help make sense of the changing world.

Hallmarks of the Anthropology + Sociology major include hands-on research opportunities, study of diverse cultures and groups, study of social change, focus on controversial political, social and economic issues and finally, attention to the diversity of human behavior and experience.

Students who major in Anthropology + Sociology have many options open to them in terms of careers and further education. An undergraduate degree in anthropology + sociology can prepare a student for work in community outreach, social services, the non-profit sector, education and for-profit sectors such as business. Students will also have the foundation to continue their education in a range of disciplines including but not limited to: anthropology, sociology, law, medicine and public policy.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Integration of anthropology and sociology
  2. “Handsā€on” applied learning
  3. Global competency
  4. Value of service
  5. Original research
  6. Critical engagement, requiring thoughtful and questioning participation in learning
Gerry Willis, Ed. D
Adjunct Professor

Ed. D in higher education administration from UMASS Boston
M.A. in Applied Sociology from UMASS Boston

Contact Information
(401) 341-2207
Office: CAS 130A

Gerry Willis

Gerry
Willis
Ed. D
Adjunct Professor

Ed. D in higher education administration from UMASS Boston
M.A. in Applied Sociology from UMASS Boston

Contact Information
(401) 341-2207
Office: CAS 130A

I am a past recipient of the Faculty Member of the Year award at Salve Regina University, which recognized my deep commitment to the teaching and learning process and student development in and out of the classroom. I have also developed numerous academic forums and seminars on many topics such as alcohol and other drug abuse, sexual assault, urban affairs, generations and culture.  Most recently I have been conducting research in the area of college students living off campus in densely populated urban areas, and identified a number of factors the led to a reduction of student offenses, disruptions, arrests, and complaints from neighbors. My work in this area has been recognized by the Association of Student Conduct Administration (ASCA) which gave me their highest award in 2011 for exceptional individual contributions to the area of higher education through leadership, new innovations, and research.

James P. Verinis
Adjunct Professor

B.F.A. Rhode Island School of Design
M.A. New School for Social Research
Ph.D. Binghamton University

Contact Information
(401) 254-3254
FCAS 130A

James P. Verinis

James P.
Verinis
Adjunct Professor

B.F.A. Rhode Island School of Design
M.A. New School for Social Research
Ph.D. Binghamton University

Contact Information
(401) 254-3254
FCAS 130A

Dr. Verinis is a cultural anthropologist whose research, conducted primarily in Greece and surrounding parts of Southeastern Europe, has focused on ethno-national identity, the revival of the modern Olympic Games, immigration, agriculture, food, and the environment. With a grant from the Wenner Gren Foundation Verinis is currently investigating the ongoing phenomenon of mass migration to Europe through Greece as well as economic austerity there. In particular he is concerned with how these socio-economic pressures are affecting agricultural development, rural life and the meaning of foods.

Alan Leveillee
Adjunct Professor

MA -Archaeology and Curriculum Planning
Applied Anthropologist and Archaeologist
Cultural Resource Management
Registered Professional Archaeologist (RPA)

Contact Information
(401) 487-0861
CAS 130A

Alan Leveillee

Alan
Leveillee
Adjunct Professor

MA -Archaeology and Curriculum Planning
Applied Anthropologist and Archaeologist
Cultural Resource Management
Registered Professional Archaeologist (RPA)

Contact Information
(401) 487-0861
CAS 130A

Alan Leveillee is a Senior Archaeologist and Principal Investigator at the Public Archaeology Laboratory Inc., He has over 35 years of archaeological and teaching experience.   He’s published more than 25 articles, is a frequent speaker and lecturer on Archaeology and Ancient Native Americans, and is the author of the book An Old Place Safe and Quiet- A Blackstone River Cremation Burial Site. 

Public Archaeology Laboratory: www.palinc.com

Shelby Carpenter, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor

Ph.D., Sociocultural Anthropology, Boston University
B.A., Anthropology & Sociology and French, Lafayette College

Contact Information
(401) 254-3439
CAS 130A

Shelby Carpenter

Shelby
Carpenter
Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor

Ph.D., Sociocultural Anthropology, Boston University
B.A., Anthropology & Sociology and French, Lafayette College

Contact Information
(401) 254-3439
CAS 130A

Dr. Shelby E. Carpenter is a sociocultural and symbolic anthropologist whose research interests include war and post-conflict reconciliation, refugees, economic development and human rights, social networks, and performance.  Topics of her research, teaching, and writing have included legal and medical anthropology; gender studies; popular culture in Africa; the development of trust post-conflict; and social and economic inequalities.

She has conducted most of her field research in West Africa (especially among Krio speakers in  Sierra Leone and Mandinka speakers in the Gambia for her doctoral studies; and among the Bamana speakers in Mali and Guinea).  She has also carried out research in northern France, Morocco, and among migrant populations in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem while a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Africa Research Unit at The Harry S. Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace. 

Dr. Carpenter has served in international development as a Small Economic Development agent in the U.S. Peace Corps in Mali (1997-1999), and as a School Feeding Program Coordinator in the U.N. World Food Program in Guinea (2000).

Saeed Hydaralli
Assistant Professor
Contact Information
x3812
131

Saeed Hydaralli

Saeed
Hydaralli
Assistant Professor
Contact Information
x3812
131
Jessica A. Skolnikoff, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology

B.A. The College of Wooster
M.A. Ph.D. American University

Contact Information
x3556
FCAS 133

Jessica A. Skolnikoff

Jessica A.
Skolnikoff
Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology

B.A. The College of Wooster
M.A. Ph.D. American University

Contact Information
x3556
FCAS 133

Dr. Jessica Skolnikoff is a cultural anthropologist who investigates youth dispositions toward physical activity across the United States. Her work explores how children develop attitudes and habits related to exercise and physical activity. Present data collection consists of interviewing families and students of middle-school age focusing on views and practices in their culture. Skolnikoff’s cross-cultural research highlights the relevance of social and cultural values that affect long-term beliefs and behaviors about physical activity.

Research Expertise:
Sport, recreation, play, gender, children, disability and identity, and teaching scholarship.

Service Activities:
Roger Williams University Faculty Athletic Representative (FAR) to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), Fall 2005-Present.
 
RWU Faculty Advisor to Peer Pals, Fall 2010-Present.
 
Advisory Board to RWU Service Learning Program, Fall 2004-Present.

Board Member At-Large of the Northeastern Anthropology Association, 2013-Present

Teal K. Rothschild, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology

B.A. Bard College
M.A., Ph.D. New School of Social Research

Contact Information
x3059
FCAS 135

Teal K. Rothschild

Teal K.
Rothschild
Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology

B.A. Bard College
M.A., Ph.D. New School of Social Research

Contact Information
x3059
FCAS 135

Dr. Rothschild is an historical sociologist whose research has always focused on the intersections of social movements and identity. Rothschild’s interests surround the larger questions of how movements shape individuals and groups both within the movements and beyond, with specific attention to issues of racialization, privilege, power, discourse, victimization, and representation in a variety of contexts all within the United States. The most recent social movements she has studied include: the day without an immigrant protests of 2006, the Militia of Montana, and the Mythopetic men’s movement.

Currently, Rothschild is working on a more creative project, writing on white privilege for a younger audience of 3-8 year olds. In addition, Rothschild is presently developing an ethnographic study of a national social movement, with a more micro focus on a state chapter of the movement. The state chapter movement members will be studied in terms of both their presentation and experience of the intersections of their race, gender, and age in relation to movement membership.

Selected Publications and Presentations

Jason Patch, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology

B.A. Arizona State University
M.A., Ph.D. New York University

Contact Information
x5723
FCAS 134

Jason Patch

Jason
Patch
Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology

B.A. Arizona State University
M.A., Ph.D. New York University

Contact Information
x5723
FCAS 134

Professor Patch is currently on sabattical leave (Spring 2014) in Paris.

Research Interests

Dr. Jason Patch studies disasters, street food vendors, gentrification, women in the city, the sociology of fashion, urban communities, and qualitative methodology.

Marybeth J. MacPhee, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair, Department of Anthropology+Sociology

B.A. Wellesley College
M.A., Ph.D. University of Arizona

Contact Information
x5407
FCAS 132

Marybeth J. MacPhee

Marybeth J.
MacPhee
Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair, Department of Anthropology+Sociology

B.A. Wellesley College
M.A., Ph.D. University of Arizona

Contact Information
x5407
FCAS 132

The central focus of Dr. Marybeth MacPhee’s work is the interaction of mind, body, and environment. In particular, her current research explores of ways that culture, community, and sense of place shape experiences of vulnerability and practices to promote health in rural Scotland. MacPhee’s research and teaching merges perspectives from the fields of cultural anthropology, public health, rural development, and sustainability studies. Previously, she has conducted ethnographic investigations on AIDS and the meanings and practices associated with anti-retroviral medications in the U.S., and on the influence of embodied experience on household health promotion practices in rural Morocco.

Select Publications and Presentations:

Consulting External Partners in Starting an Undergraduate Public Health Program. November 2013 (poster), ASPPH Undergraduate Education for Public Health Summit, Boston. Co-authors: Dr. Kerri Warren and Dr. Tom Sorger, RWU Department of Biology.

Jeremy M. Campbell, Ph.D
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Coordinator, Sustainability Studies Program

B.A. Davidson College
M.A., Ph.D. University of California-Santa Cruz

Contact Information
x3583
FCAS 137
Areas of Expertise: 
Anthropology

Jeremy M. Campbell

Jeremy M.
Campbell
Ph.D
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Coordinator, Sustainability Studies Program

B.A. Davidson College
M.A., Ph.D. University of California-Santa Cruz

Contact Information
x3583
FCAS 137
Areas of Expertise: 
Anthropology

Dr. Jeremy M. Campbell is a political and environmental anthropologist whose work focuses on land conflicts, ecological change, and the state in the Brazilian Amazon. He is particularly interested in the ways people come to know their environment and how that knowledge becomes politicized in moments of broad and rapid socioeconomic changes. In Brazil, Campbell conducts ethnographic research on the forms of authority and place-making that local peoples improvise as the character of Amazonia shifts from that of an extractive frontier to a workshop for sustainability schemes.