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Department of Anthropology+Sociology

Jessica A. Skolnikoff, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology and Chair, Department of Anthropology+Sociology
B.A. The College of Wooster; M.A. Ph.D. American University
Contact Information
x3556
FCAS 132

Jessica A. Skolnikoff

Jessica A.
Skolnikoff
Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology and Chair, Department of Anthropology+Sociology
B.A. The College of Wooster; M.A. Ph.D. American University
Contact Information
x3556
FCAS 132

Dr. Jessica Skolnikoff is a cultural anthropologist who investigates youth dispositions toward physical activity across the United States. Her work explores how children develop attitudes and habits related to exercise and physical activity. Present data collection consists of interviewing families and students of middle-school age focusing on views and practices in their culture. Skolnikoff’s cross-cultural research highlights the relevance of social and cultural values that affect long-term beliefs and behaviors about physical activity.

Research Expertise:
Sport, recreation, play, gender, children, disability and identity, and teaching scholarship.

Service Activities:
Roger Williams University Faculty Athletic Representative (FAR) to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), Fall 2005-Present.
 
RWU Faculty Advisor to Peer Pals, Fall 2010-Present.
 
Advisory Board to RWU Service Learning Program, Fall 2004-Present.

Board Member At-Large of the Northeastern Anthropology Association, 2013-Present

Teal K. Rothschild, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
B.A. Bard College, M.A., Ph.D. New School of Social Research
Contact Information
x3059
FCAS 135

Teal K. Rothschild

Teal K.
Rothschild
Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
B.A. Bard College, M.A., Ph.D. New School of Social Research
Contact Information
x3059
FCAS 135

Dr. Rothschild is an historical sociologist whose research has always focused on the intersections of social movements and identity. Rothschild’s interests surround the larger questions of how movements shape individuals and groups both within the movements and beyond, with specific attention to issues of racialization, privilege, power, discourse, victimization, and representation in a variety of contexts all within the United States. The most recent social movements she has studied include: the day without an immigrant protests of 2006, the Militia of Montana, and the Mythopetic men’s movement.

Currently, Rothschild is working on a more creative project, writing on white privilege for a younger audience of 3-8 year olds. In addition, Rothschild is presently developing an ethnographic study of a national social movement, with a more micro focus on a state chapter of the movement. The state chapter movement members will be studied in terms of both their presentation and experience of the intersections of their race, gender, and age in relation to movement membership.

Selected Publications and Presentations

Jason Patch, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
B.A. Arizona State University; M.A., Ph.D. New York University
Contact Information
x5723
FCAS 134

Jason Patch

Jason
Patch
Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
B.A. Arizona State University; M.A., Ph.D. New York University
Contact Information
x5723
FCAS 134

Professor Patch is currently on sabattical leave (Spring 2014) in Paris.

Research Interests

Dr. Jason Patch studies disasters, street food vendors, gentrification, women in the city, the sociology of fashion, urban communities, and qualitative methodology.

Marybeth J. MacPhee, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A., Ph.D. University of Arizona
Contact Information
x5407
FCAS 133

Marybeth J. MacPhee

Marybeth J.
MacPhee
Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Anthropology
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A., Ph.D. University of Arizona
Contact Information
x5407
FCAS 133

The central focus of Dr. Marybeth MacPhee’s work is the interaction of mind, body, and environment. In particular, her current research explores of ways that culture, community, and sense of place shape experiences of vulnerability and practices to promote health in rural Scotland. MacPhee’s research and teaching merges perspectives from the fields of cultural anthropology, public health, rural development, and sustainability studies. Previously, she has conducted ethnographic investigations on AIDS and the meanings and practices associated with anti-retroviral medications in the U.S., and on the influence of embodied experience on household health promotion practices in rural Morocco.

Select Publications and Presentations:

Consulting External Partners in Starting an Undergraduate Public Health Program. November 2013 (poster), ASPPH Undergraduate Education for Public Health Summit, Boston. Co-authors: Dr. Kerri Warren and Dr. Tom Sorger, RWU Department of Biology.

Jeremy M. Campbell, Ph.D
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
B.A. Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D. University of California-Santa Cruz
Contact Information
x3583
FCAS 137

Jeremy M. Campbell

Jeremy M.
Campbell
Ph.D
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
B.A. Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D. University of California-Santa Cruz
Contact Information
x3583
FCAS 137

Dr. Jeremy M. Campbell is a political and environmental anthropologist whose work focuses on land conflicts, ecological change, and the state in the Brazilian Amazon. He is particularly interested in the ways people come to know their environment and how that knowledge becomes politicized in moments of broad and rapid socioeconomic changes. In Brazil, Campbell conducts ethnographic research on the forms of authority and place-making that local peoples improvise as the character of Amazonia shifts from that of an extractive frontier to a workshop for sustainability schemes. Among his completed and ongoing projects are the following:

Property Schemes and Colonial Territorialities: Campbell is currently finishing a book, Conjuring Property: Speculation and Environmental Futures in the Brazilian Amazon about the material and imagined effects of land speculation along an unpaved forest highway. This ethnographic work sheds light on how local environmental knowledge and projections of the future development on the region combine in surprising ways to position migrants and native Amazonians in their engagements with state and market.