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School of Architecture, Art, & Historic Preservation

Student Academic Showcase: Keynote Address

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) 2015 keynote address will be delivered by Robert Quinn, executive director of Scholars at Risk Network. The event is open to the public.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning and afternoon sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning and afternoon sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning and afternoon sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning and afternoon sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

Student Academic Showcase and Honors

The Student Academic Symposium and Honors (SASH) provides a forum for students to present their scholarly and creative work before an audience of peers. There are standing displays all week, as well as morning and afternoon sessions consisting of students’ poster presentations; and afternoon and evening sessions consisting of concurrent sessions that include students’ thesis, capstone and other paper or project presentations, panel discussions, displays of design work, exhibitions of visual and multimedia artifacts, performing arts recitals, literary readings, theatrical performances, and spotlighting of Community Partnership Center projects.

President’s Distinguished Speakers Series: Jane Elliott

In 1968, as a third-grade schoolteacher in small-town Iowa, Jane Elliott devised the controversial “Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes” exercise in response to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Forty-seven years later, it remains one of the most powerful illustrations of the injurious effects of prejudice and discrimination.

With clips from “Eye of the Storm” – an ABC News documentary on her exercise – the esteemed teacher, presenter and diversity trainer will explore power, perception and prejudice in modern-day America, sharing ideas on topics from microagressions to privilege to stereotypes and more in a presentation titled "Blue-Eyed, Brown-Eyed."

The event is also part of a yearlong series at RWU titled 150 Years Later: The 13th Amendment & Race in America, which calls upon us to both celebrate the monumental legislation to abolish slavery, but also to reflect critically on the current state of race relations in the U.S.

President’s Distinguished Speakers Series: Panel Discussion Featuring Leonard Pitts Jr.

In his second visit to RWU, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Leonard Pitts Jr. will join a panel of experts and commentators from the University and beyond in discussing the 1865 amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which abolished slavery in America, and its impact over the 150 years since its passage in a presentation titled: "The Modern Legacy of the 13th Amendment and Race Relations in the U.S." 

Other panelists include:

In an Inequitable Election Process, How to Regain the 'Equal Vote'

February 27, 2015

BRISTOL, R.I. – When it comes to achieving top political office in America, enough money can supplant the intention of “a government for the people, by the people.”

That's according to acclaimed author, attorney and activist Lawrence Lessig, who addressed a standing-room-only audience on Monday, Feb. 23, as part of the President’s Distinguished Speakers Series. With less than one percent of the population providing nearly three-quarters of all federal campaign funding via Super PACs, he said, equality in political representation is far from reality in America.

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How to Talk About Race Without Starting a Riot: David Wilson Returns to RWU

February 9, 2015

BRISTOL, R.I. – Drawing on history, current events and his own experience as a young black man growing up in Newark, N.J., journalist and filmmaker David A. Wilson has emerged as a leading voice in encouraging an open dialogue and national conversation on race relations in America.

On Tuesday, Feb. 17, Wilson will make his second visit to Roger Williams University as part of the President’s Distinguished Speakers Series for an event titled “How to Talk About Race Without Starting a Riot.” Wilson’s groundbreaking documentary, “Meeting David Wilson,” will be screened in its entirety, and a question and answer session will follow.

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